keypad eliminator

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by Model-a, Feb 19, 2013.

  1. Model-a

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 16, 2009
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    I am installing a burgler alarm my shop and want to have a momentary switch closure to arm-disarm the unit. It came with a keypad which requires a 4 button entry to do the arm-disarm function.
     
  2. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
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    Most if not all alarm systems require a code entry to disable the alarm.
    How do you plan to do this with a single button?
     
  3. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    He plans for us to tell him how to do it with one button.
    Not likely, considering that everything that can count to 3 has a microprocessor in it nowadays, and the manufacturers make sure nobody can get the programming code for them.
     
  4. tshuck

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 18, 2012
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    Disarming an alarm without verification kind of defeats the purpose of the alarm, no?

    Perhaps you could tell me where your shop is...?:rolleyes:
     
  5. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
    7,394
    1,606
    Just get something like this and tell it where the 4 buttons on the alarm are, then hit it's START button:

    [​IMG]

    It's probably possible to replace their keypad with some sort of keypad simulator where it does the same thing electronically (instead of mechanically).

    However, if the additional security of an alarm code is not important, just get a Sharpie pen and write the code above the keypad.
     
  6. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
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    how silly.. Just remove the alarm system because you are basically attempting to defeating 90% of its actual "security"
     
  7. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
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    The OP's plan can maintain security if the arm/disarm button location is unknown to unwelcome visitors.

    I assume he's talking about a system that has the keypad inside the perimeter, and that it must be disarmed within 30-60 seconds of a breach. If the perp can't find the keypad-equivalent in that time, it's still somewhat secure.

    If we're talking about an external keypad that must receive a code before a door opens, the OP's approach obviously wouldn't work.
     
  8. Model-a

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 16, 2009
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    I'm going to use a keyswitch. The alarm board has 4 input terminals which I can choose which of the 9 wires from the keypad and set my own code. I assume that each terminal just requires a pulse in sequence to arm-disarm the alarm board.
     
  9. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
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    My bet is your assumption is wrong.
     
  10. Model-a

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 16, 2009
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    This is a 10 to 20 year old alarm system which doesn't appear to ever been used and the owners manual doesn't say anything about programming a chip on the board.
     
  11. thatoneguy

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 19, 2009
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    Security through obscurity doesn't work. All it takes is one person to know where the switch is, and word would spread fast. Key-switches can be opened easily, either by going for the wire, or a pick, they have "instant picks" for the barrel type locks, I have one, it works great for finding the right replacement key in under 30 seconds.

    Same problem as writing your PIN on the back of your bank card. :eek:
     
  12. Model-a

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 16, 2009
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    That isn't what I wanted to hear, but I will take your advice and stick with the keypad. Thanks for the input
    Allen
     
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