Jet-injected drugs may mean the end of needles

Discussion in 'General Science' started by bertus, May 26, 2012.

  1. bertus

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  2. Wendy

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    That used to be a stable on Star Trek, and our military. I can't tell where the differences between this and the other process is though.

    I have heard stories where people passing out get sliced by the process.
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2012
  3. KL7AJ

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    The military has been using this method for decades for mass inoculations, but it's pretty expensive...or at least was. :) Maybe they've got that part fixed. :)

    Eric
     
  4. atferrari

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    I saw that at Rio de Janeiro not less than 20 years ago to vacinate people in the streets. Seemed quite simple equipment and small in size.
     
  5. strantor

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    I got those in boot camp. it's not exactly painless. an injection from someone who knows what they are doing, hurts less. There's also a psychological factor, as the injection gun is noisy and a little kid would be absolutely terrified of if, especially if they had already seen someone else get injected.
     
  6. gerty

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    Received Injections like that in 1970 at Parris Island. Guns were powered by large oxygen (?) cylinders that were tied to the building columns next to the Corpsmen. Guns themselves reminded me of spray paint guns with vial on top and hose coming into bottom of handle.
     
  7. Wendy

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    I get the feeling there was supposed to be something different about this, though if there was they didn't express it clearly.
     
  8. strantor

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    one uses compressed air in a tank, and the other uses a high speed solenoid to inject - that's the only difference I see..
     
  9. gerty

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    The electric one only carries one dose, and appears to be very portable.
     
  10. BSomer

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  11. gerty

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    I believe you have found it, or at least a variation of it :D
     
  12. strantor

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    yeah, that's the one. Look at the sheer terror on the kid's face.
     
  13. WBahn

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    Ditto on boot camp. I got several of these needleless injections in basic training in 1985. I was of mixed opinion whether is was more or less painful than a traditional needle stick, which means it was about the same. The guy a couple places ahead of me would have had a very different opinion, though. He jerked at just the wrong time and got his arm sliced open. Of course, that caused several folks behind him to faint, one of whom was getting a shot at a different station and got his arm sliced as well. It was at that point that I looked down and noticed that there was actually quite a bit of blood, both wet and dry, on the concrete pad where this was being done.

    I think this is much ado about nothing. At best, it is an incremental improvement on a decades old common practice. I tend to think that a large fraction of "news" today is recycled stories.
     
  14. strantor

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    would that make them "olds"?
     
  15. Wendy

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    If I understand the mechanism correctly, you should be able to heat the metal enough to sterilize the heads. I was surprised to read blood was transfered.
     
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