Japanese voltage

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by sardinops, Jan 14, 2013.

  1. sardinops

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 14, 2013
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    Hi, I'm new here. I've installed a US Kenmore oven in N Japan where the voltage is 100V and frequency is 50 Hertz. It employs an electrical ignition system. It works but takes a long time to light. Should I use a step up transformer to 120 Volts? Would it light faster? Also the clock runs slowly (but I can live with that).
    TIA
    Rod
     
  2. spinnaker

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 29, 2009
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    If I had to guess, this question violates the TOS. No member is going to help you blow up or burn down your house.

    If the clock is running slowly then it sounds like you either have the wrong model of oven or you have it configured wrong. You should check the owner's manual and see if there is some kind of switch for the power. Switch should be right near where you plug it in.
     
  3. sardinops

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 14, 2013
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    If I'm just stepping up the voltage from 100 to 120 V which is returning the situation to what the oven was used to in US why would the house burn down?
     
  4. takao21203

    Distinguished Member

    Apr 28, 2012
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    I don't see a safety risk.

    Due to a combination of both lower voltage + lower frequency, the power is much lower. Maybe you can modify the ignition electrodes. I would only recommend that if you know the bells and whistles a bit and can manage.

    If you don't feel good about it, leave it as it is.
     
  5. sardinops

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 14, 2013
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    Thanks. Modifying the oven is beyond me. So I had better just modify the electricity that comes into it. I have a 120 to 110 volt transformer so I'll just reverse it.
     
  6. takao21203

    Distinguished Member

    Apr 28, 2012
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    If you can open it and examine the electrical parts for abnormal heat developement. 100 or 120V for most purposes is totally minor.

    However equipment using gas is always a safety issue. I saw photos of people doing gas pipes themselves or even professional installations where gas pipes made from plastic became porous after some years.
     
  7. BReeves

    Member

    Nov 24, 2012
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    The clock issue is because it was designed for 60hz and is running on 50hz, would guess the ignitor is transformer fed and the secondary isn't putting out the same voltage it would on 120 @ 60hz. I would see if I couldn't find a replacement clock motor and contact the stove manfacture to see if you can get a wiring diagram (schematic) of the stove. Look at the ignition circuit and see if it can be modified.

    Non of this is messing with the gas plumbing and the worst that can happen is it won't work.
     
  8. PatM

    Active Member

    Dec 31, 2010
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    You still will have a problem, as you are operating a device that is designed for 60Hz and trying to run it on 50Hz.
    This is a bad idea !!
     
  9. takao21203

    Distinguished Member

    Apr 28, 2012
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    It makes not much difference, more so because at 50Hz, RPMs etc. will be lower. Otherwise motors would wear out a little faster, which you pretty much can observe for desktop fans if you run them 24/7. They will last about 1/2 of a year.

    Analogue Televisions of course won't work if you change the frequency, not so much because of the power supply.

    Few appliances work just at the margin of a safety risk. I doubt even if there are any such appliances.
     
  10. BillB3857

    Senior Member

    Feb 28, 2009
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    As for the ignition, many ovens use a ceramic ignitor (a high power heating element that glows white hot), not a spark. This ingitor will ignite a low flow gas stream similar to the old standing pilot. Once the small gas flame is established, thermocouple safeties take over. The long delay is that with 100V (Frequency won't matter) driving a heater designed for 120V a long heat up time and lower heat levels are generated.
    To verify, look inside the oven toward the back and watch for the glow.

    As others have said, the clock will run slow due to the 50 cycle power.
     
  11. ramancini8

    Member

    Jul 18, 2012
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    If the clock is not mechanical there may be a 50/60 Hertz jumper on the board.
     
  12. sardinops

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 14, 2013
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    Yes that is correct. The oven uses those ceramic glow plugs. The range uses sparks which work fine. The oven is rated for 120 V, 60 Hz and 5 Amps. Memory of my school physics tells me I would need at least a 600 W transformer, right?

    Actually there are probably devices sold here that convert both the current and voltage so that one can use US appliances in Japan. Takao, any idea what they are called in Japanese?
    Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2013
  13. BillB3857

    Senior Member

    Feb 28, 2009
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    Maybe an email to the range manufacturer to see if they have a glow plug rated for 100V. If they sell a similar range in Japan, they probably could even put you in contact with a Japanese supplier.
     
  14. GopherT

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
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    Common, you are in the land of awesome consumer electronics. Stuff that no American would think about buying. Go out and buy a new stove. Get one with an LCD TV on the oven door and voice activated burner controllers.
     
  15. sardinops

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 14, 2013
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    haha they don't sell big gas ovens. At least not for homes and unless I want to spend $2500
     
  16. takao21203

    Distinguished Member

    Apr 28, 2012
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    I can ask when one of my contacts is online, may take a while.
     
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