I've seen high prices at specialty stores before but this is crazy

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by GopherT, Aug 11, 2016.

  1. GopherT

    Thread Starter AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
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    A battery for an old two-way radio...
    I couldn't image a Purchase Order going though on this. Like Battery Giant winning the lottery!


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    https://www.batterygiant.com/batteries/BNH-370

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    Compare to Amazon
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    Compare Battery Universe...
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  2. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
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    All they have to do is sell one battery for a nice tidy profit for the year. ;)
     
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  3. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
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    Probably a currency conversion faux pa?
     
  4. nsaspook

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 27, 2009
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    Code word for "flux Capacitor"?
     
  5. GopherT

    Thread Starter AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
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    The little nuclear orbits around the Battery Giant's image just might be indicating something like that.
     
  6. jpanhalt

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    Jan 18, 2008
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    Order one and ask if it takes checks or COD.

    John
     
  7. GopherT

    Thread Starter AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
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    I just stopped by the store for a 370 watch battery (I found the million-dollar BNH-370 by accident). I told them about it. Some software glitch - random digits with many items. They think someone was adding comments with the prices when the set up the new system. The in-store price was $24.99 (in stock).
     
  8. joeyd999

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  9. WBahn

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    Mar 31, 2012
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    Not after the order processes! :D
     
  10. boatsman

    Senior Member

    Jan 17, 2008
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    GopherT
    It was a special offer; they just forgot to indicate that the dollars were Zimbabwe ones!
     
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  11. GopherT

    Thread Starter AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
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    Or that the seller was getting the "special" deal.
     
  12. Aleph(0)

    Member

    Mar 14, 2015
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    I say it's all down to confusion cuz of use of commas as decimals in some cultures. If they were asking $1.3K I'd believe it cuz like Amazon has been pulling that $#it with books for years and if you need it NOW and they are the first site you see maybe you just swallow pride and order while the ordering is good! So up to a few grand more than something is worth is one thing but they'd know nobody will pay $1.3M for a battery that could be custom manufactured for less than $100!
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2016
  13. Hypatia's Protege

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 1, 2015
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    Oh yes! -- I yet remember the listing (a year or so back) of a used 1978 Radio Amateur's Handbook (predecessor to the ARRL Handbook) for $2500 (USD) -- and it sold! -- But then, as you point out, if someone's "just gotta have it" 'shopping around' is a readily dispensable luxury - been there myself:oops:, so brand me as an enabler:oops::D


    Don't be too certain of that!? -- I know I'd rather pay $1.3M than $(factorial of 100):p:D

    TTFN
    HP:)
     
  14. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
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    Once when reordering some trinket (an auto bot transformer logo) off EBay I had clicked ORDER before fully reading the page, my excuse being I had done this very part from the very vendor before and it was too cheap to price search. When I got to PayPal I saw it was now $200 bucks! I hit the vendor to cancel the thing.

    I was told he wanted to keep the listing up, but he was out of stock, so he made the price silly so no one would buy it.

    Yep, I get a stupid award for that one, even though it cost me nothing more than a few emails.
     
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  15. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
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    I guess I can see his line of reasoning, but how many people shopping for that for the first time and saw his ridiculous pricing made the decision that he was a scammer and to never consider doing business with him ever? First impressions.
     
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  16. Hypatia's Protege

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 1, 2015
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    Or, worse yet, someone pays his price and receives nothing:eek: -- IMO $200 is hardly sufficient to guarantee lack of interest...

    Best regards
    HP:)
     
  17. tcmtech

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 4, 2013
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    Another action behind those high price tags is it can be used for money laundering.

    The average guy will do just like you guys are doing right now but say I and one or more of you have to make some questionable cash appear to have a legitimate sources for day to day appearances I just sell you a 'Vintage 1985 production ) 2N3055 transistor for $25K and then you sell me a 'NOS' 6V6GT vacuum tube for back for $25K and we're good on the books! ;)
     
  18. WBahn

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    Mar 31, 2012
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    Certainly a possibility, but I doubt that it is done this way very often -- the audit trail has to many chances for someone to recognize such outrageous transactions and start looking at them too closely from both ends. In your example, how was that transistor paid for and where did the money come from? The more common approach to trade-based money laundering is to use cash-intensive businesses that are service-oriented. If you offer a service that has no tangible result -- for instance consulting services of some kind -- then it is all but impossible to establish how much service you actually provided versus how much you were paid for.

    I recall a case from back when I was in junior high, I think, where a movie theatre specialized in special showings of classic films around the clock. They averaged about half capacity sales overall. In actuality, they typically had a few dozen movie goers and the rest of the ticket sales were fictitious. This went on for years before the FBI caught wind of it (from the other side of the transactions) and it took them a long time (another couple years, I think) to collect enough data to prove that their claimed revenue could not be supported by their actual movie attendance.

    Another common way is to go to a casino and buy chips for cash (in small enough batches as to not draw any attention) and then cash them back out later (without gambling anything) and claim them as gambling winnings.

    Traveling carnivals (and the like) have been a mainstay of money laundering because it is cash intensive will little linkage between outlays and revenue. It costs almost exactly the same to run a ride that gets two riders and hour or two hundred. It's virtually impossible to establish that the bottle-ring-toss booth only gave out enough in prizes to justify 1% of the number of players it claimed.

    Yet another favorite is selling premium versions of everyday things. A restaurant sells a steak dinner for $20 but offers a private candlelight dining experience complete for $220/couple. If the restaurant actually sells twenty steak dinners a day and claims that they sold ten normal dinners and had five couples that did the private dinners, they have just brought in $1000 onto the books and their inventory outlay is in perfect agreement with their claims. That alone allows them to launder hundreds of thousands of dollars a year.
     
  19. SLK001

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 29, 2011
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    I once talked to a vendor about a similar situation with his website. He said that it was priced like that when they were out of stock on an item. The software that he ran caused so many problems when it came to removing the item, then replacing it when the item came back into stock that it caused him to grossly inflate the price so nobody would order it until it came back into stock. It seems stupid to do it like this, but sometimes the website designers did such a crappy site design that terrible work-arounds were forced on the vendor.
     
  20. tcmtech

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 4, 2013
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    Not my problem where the money came from.

    Do yo worry about where other peoples money comes from when they buy something from you or if they get audited that their auditor is going to track you down and question you about what you sold and why?

    I never have.
     
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