Is this correct? (grammar)

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by cumesoftware, Feb 18, 2011.

  1. cumesoftware

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Apr 27, 2007
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    Hello, I'm designing the fronto of an audio amplifier (actually it is Taurus), and I want it to have the following:
    "LM3875-Driven Hi-End Stereo Amplifier"

    Is this correct? Or is this preferable?
    "LM3875-Powered Hi-End Stereo Amplifier"

    or
    "LM3875-Based Hi-End Stereo Amplifier"

    Thanks in advance.

    P.S.: Take a look at the drawing.
    front.jpg
     
  2. Georacer

    Moderator

    Nov 25, 2009
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    I think it is "driven". The amplifier drives the output. The power comes from the energy source. My humble opinion.
     
  3. cumesoftware

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Apr 27, 2007
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    Thanks!

    What about the "-"? Should it stay, or should it be "LM3875 Driven..." instead?
     
  4. cumesoftware

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Apr 27, 2007
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    Anyone please?
     
  5. jpanhalt

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 18, 2008
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    Since it is being used as a logo, you can say whatever you want. Grammar is not really a big issue. Have you considered some even shorter versions, such as:

    LM3875 Hi-End Stereo Amplifier
    Advanced LM3875 Stereo Amplifier

    And so forth.

    John
     
  6. Georacer

    Moderator

    Nov 25, 2009
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    I 'm not sure about it. I find both "-" and without it cases when using the word driven. Maybe someone with English as their native language can tell us. I would go without it, I guess.
     
  7. jpanhalt

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 18, 2008
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    For proper grammar, serial nouns are usually hyphenated when used as adjectives and coming before the main noun. Thus, 28-year-old man. Without the hyphens, one occasionally can be ambiguous. Compare the meanings of "old horse trainer" (the trainer is old) vs. "old-horse trainer" (the trainer trains old horses). Usually there is no ambiguity from context, but ambiguities when present can be humorous.

    However, in the context of how you are using it, I wouldn't worry.

    John
     
  8. cumesoftware

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Apr 27, 2007
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    The same here, hence my doubt.

    Thanks John. I've considered "LM3875 Hi-End Stereo Amplifier", but people might interpret "LM3875" as the model and "Taurus" as the make. "Taurus" is meant to be the model, not the make.
     
  9. jpanhalt

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 18, 2008
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    A lot of electronic jargon and abbreviations are used in sales. Remember when double-oversampling and FET input were the rage? I just checked my 20 year-old radio. It says, "Quartz Synthesized Tuner Amplifier." No hyphens and obviously ambiguous.

    I still suggest that you go with what looks good. You may want to remember in the world of branding, service marks, and trademarks, not being grammatically correct can be an advantage. If the label is absolutely grammatically correct, a competitor may use it and claim it was an ordinary description, not your brand/trademark.

    A common example of that is the absence of plural and other forms in trademarks. Thus, you can have a Coke, or a dozen Coke (not Cokes). Xerox is another example. It is not a verb.

    John

    EDIT: It just occurred to me that LM3785 might itself be trademarked. I would definitely check into that before using it as part of a product's name.

    EDIT2: It does not appear to be registered with the USPTO: http://tess2.uspto.gov/bin/gate.exe?f=searchss&state=4010:vpb7ls.1.1
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2011
  10. Georacer

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    Nov 25, 2009
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    John, your professionalism reaches the realm of legendary.
     
  11. cumesoftware

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Apr 27, 2007
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    Well, since there is a possibility that LM3875 might be also a trademark from NS, I guess I'll have to take it. Thanks!
     
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