Is there a practical way to remove multi pin DIP ICs ?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by LETITROLL, Jun 14, 2014.

  1. LETITROLL

    Thread Starter Member

    Oct 9, 2013
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    Hello dear members .

    Recently i came across many DIP ICs that needs to be swapped, i have successfully removed some 8 pin ones though , but its a pain to remove the ones with 14 pins and above without damaging some solder holes witch makes the repair more time consuming .

    Am sure me and other members will take benefit of this , please share your methods and techniques .
     
  2. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    What I usually do, presuming you do not want to keep the old one!
    Is to clip all leads and use a solder sucker to remove individual pins.
    I always fit a socket for future events, if possible.
    Max.
     
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  3. inwo

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 7, 2013
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    Like Max says. +1

    I also have a dip solder tip that heats all pins at once.

    Re soldering all solder joins before removal is a big help.

    The quick and dirty way, for non critical circuits, is to not remove them.
    Clip the old leads long.
    Form them to hold pressure on socket pins.
    Solder socket leads to stubs.

    I know it sounds redneck, but it limits stress on pads and traces.
     
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  4. GopherT

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
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    Use solder wick to remove most of the solder.

    If it cannot be lifted off of the board after solder wick, Have a friend grab the IC with a pair of pliers and then hit the bottom side with a hot air gun. Try to shield other areas with foil to avoid blowing off any SMDs on the copper dose.
     
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  5. takao21203

    Distinguished Member

    Apr 28, 2012
    3,577
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    with a desoldering pump you can even remove DIP40 ICs.

    Epoxy PCBs can be hard to desolder however, even if you get it out in the end, the PCB will become damaged.

    When you extracted all the solder from a single side PCB, simply move a screwdriver under the IC and lever it out.
     
  6. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
    4,771
    971
    solder sucker
    or
    dip tweezer tips
    or
    a dip in a solder pot (kapton tape can be used to cover other areas you don't want to disturb)
     
  7. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    In 1973 I worked at a factory where the re-work person had a full blown, foot pedal operated, vacuum pump powered, solder sucker. She could change parts so well that you couldn't tell she had been there.

    Seriously. The red dot that was on the bad part was missing and I could never tell which part I had sent that machine to get replaced.

    So, it can be done. Just, how much are you willing to spend to get factory original quality?
     
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  8. loosewire

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 25, 2008
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    In some applications they are using flat grille cooker on low heat ,it heats all the pins

    evenly to assist in removal.
     
  9. absf

    Senior Member

    Dec 29, 2010
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    For small and cheap TTL chips I'd use methods already outlined by Max and inwo. But for bigger chips (>= 24pins) I would use method used by GopherT.

    But I learned one thing here using GopherT's method. I didn't remove the excess solder from the holes and just directly blowing hot air onto the chip to be removed at the bottom. This worked but after removing a few chips like that, the whole PCB appeared to become bent and couldn't lay flat on the table.:D:confused:

    I also have a heavy portable vice for doing this job. I used my left holding the chip extractor and my right with the hot air blower. And kept the blower moving from side to side to keep the temperature even.

    Allen
     
  10. inwo

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 7, 2013
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    The piggy back socket method is great for non-servicable potted boards. Of which I run into often!:eek:
    You can even leave the old chip in place. A thin cut with cut-off wheel down each side separates the pins.

    Try it you'll like it.
    Who is going to know?:D
     
  11. LETITROLL

    Thread Starter Member

    Oct 9, 2013
    218
    2
    Thanks for the comments .

    I was looking actually for a way to heat all pins at once , and pull the IC from underneath , This way i can get a clean lift .

    Guess i have to invest in some professional tools sooner or later .
     
  12. LETITROLL

    Thread Starter Member

    Oct 9, 2013
    218
    2
    The solder pot and tweezers seems to be more practical .

    Thanks ;)
     
  13. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    I have a trough shaped bit for the iron I have that covers all pins, it works so-so, I usually resort to the clipping pins, as it is rare that I want to save the old one.
    Max.
     
  14. JoeJester

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 26, 2005
    3,373
    1,159
    look up solder extractor. The run from simple bulbs to thousands of dollars Pace rework stations.

    I used solder wick and then an IC puller. I also used powered desoldering stations.
     
  15. inwo

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 7, 2013
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    +1 on the so-so;)
     
  16. LETITROLL

    Thread Starter Member

    Oct 9, 2013
    218
    2
    Just regarding that solder tip , is it possible to make one , not just for DIPs but any other unusual formats .

    Can i make some tips using copper metal ?? or do they make special metal for that ?
     
  17. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    The ones I have are tin plated copper.
    Max.
     
  18. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    Copper dissolves in lead solder so quickly that I wouldn't waste time making a tip that won't last more than maybe 20 or 30 uses. Look for something retail with proper outer coating.
     
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  19. ScottWang

    Moderator

    Aug 23, 2012
    4,855
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    You may need like this and this -- the iron head T-tip.
     
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  20. LETITROLL

    Thread Starter Member

    Oct 9, 2013
    218
    2
    Yeah this will work so-so :D
     
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