Is that true? About polarity...

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by Lightfire, Mar 29, 2011.

  1. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
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    Hello,


    My lamp had a polarity and some says that if you put the terminals incorrectly into the battery, there is a possibility that the lamp will explode or something. OK now, is it true?

    My lamp is not dimmable. What does it mean?
     
  2. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    With LEDs maybe, but not with a conventional incandescent light bulb.
     
  3. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
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    21
    Hello Bill Marsden. :)

    My lamp is compact fluorescent lamp if i remember correctly. yes it is. :D

    anyway, can you explain me whats not dimmable means in lamps? O_O
     
  4. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    Basically a dimmer circuit makes the light brightness adjustable, it is called a dimmer. An AC version uses a device called an SCR (silicon controlled rectifier). My PWM article will work on LEDs and incandescent lights OK. A florescent light works differently than both of the others. It is a low pressure gas with two incandescent filaments on the ends. It takes high voltage to start, but low voltage to keep going, so it is a popular portable light.

    If you are interested in florescent lights I'll go into more detail. They are closely related to neon lights, but there are significant differences. A white LED is also related to a florescent light too, both use a phosphore chemical that glows in the presence of blue or ultraviolet.
     
  5. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
    690
    21
    Bill_Marsden, :D thank you for the info you gave. :D

    Now, can you say to me what is the "+" and "-" terminal of a cfl???
     
  6. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    In and of themselves flourescent lights don't really have a polarity, however, they use solid state electronics to drive them, which definately does.

    Have you read the Wikipedia article on CFLs?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compact_fluorescent_lamp

    Personally I believe flourescent lights days are numbers, they will be replaced with LEDs.
     
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