Is photography gels glass works in night?

Discussion in 'General Science' started by engr.sajidzaman, Aug 7, 2011.

  1. engr.sajidzaman

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 9, 2010
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  2. Markd77

    Senior Member

    Sep 7, 2009
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    The goggles just block some colours, they won't let you see infrared. At night you will just see blackness.
     
  3. engr.sajidzaman

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    May 9, 2010
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  4. Markd77

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    Sep 7, 2009
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    "Pure hoax"
    You can't see IR, no filter will change that.
    <ed>Digital cameras / camcorders can see infrared but there is no need for the gels</ed>
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2011
  5. Kermit2

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
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    The human eye only sees red to dark blue.

    If the infrared could excite a substance to emit light in the red to dark blue spectrum then your eye could see 'infrared'. But only if it is first changed to a freq. in the red to dark blue range. A filter will not do this. A filter will remove a freq from the spectrum passing through, but nothing else. You need a substance which will absorb infrared and 're-radiate' at a visible wavelength. Something similar to the phosphors inside fluorescent light bulbs. They absorb UV light created by electrically excited mercury ions and re-radiate visible wavelengths.
     
  6. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    I have seen magic on YouTube, but yet I still don't believe in magic. Do you believe in magic?

    Night vision does exist in several forms, but not like this (as has been stated). A simple CCD camera (digital cameras or camcorders) see deeper into the infrared than humans. Simple light sources, such as IR LEDs, will illuminate the scene and you won't see a thing. Far as I know, all night vision is done electronically.
     
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