Is it possible to construct a simple vibration source in laboratory?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by twomilimeter, Dec 27, 2009.

  1. twomilimeter

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 23, 2009
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    I did several vibration tests on a electrical machine before using PCB accelerometer and Agilent 35670A. However, the results are not consistent. I really wish to find out the reasons of the inconsistency. Is my measurement approach is wrong? Or, something wrong with the mechanical setup?

    To help me troubleshooting my problem, I wish to have a vibration source, which will give constant output (e.g. consistent vibration peak magnitude and frequency). Is it possible to create a simple one in laboratory?

    Thanks
     
  2. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
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    There is always an electric motor with an out of balance mass on the shaft.
     
  3. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
    5,435
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    Glue a (light) weight to a speaker driver (speaker cone) then drive it with your lab signal generator with the waveform you desire.
     
  4. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    Vibrators on pagers are tiny electric motors with an offset weight, similar to what beenthere suggested. You could do the same on a large scale. Measure the speed, if you can match the speed you can repeat the experiment with a high degree of precision.
     
  5. steinar96

    Active Member

    Apr 18, 2009
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    Take a large washing machine, open it. Remove the large stone weight. Close it and turn it on. Now thats a vibration source :D. Be carefull though, the washing machine might try to run away.
     
  6. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
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    He may only wish to vibrate an experiment and not the whole building.
     
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