Iron Tip Calibration

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Dr.killjoy, Jun 11, 2013.

  1. Dr.killjoy

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Apr 28, 2013
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    I have a hakko 939 and I am using a chinese 907 handle ... My plan was to use a real hakko element in place of the fake element and here is my problem I think ... The iron has 3 digit codes on the side of each tip for calibration reason and my 907 iron does not use those codes anymore .... I was hoping to buy a tip thermometer and measure the tip to see how far off the calibration is and adjust from there ... So what you guys think??



    Also would you trust this listing for a Genuine Hakko Heating element ????
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/OEM-Solderi...58-959-A1321-24V-50W-/290804765247#vi-content
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2013
  2. PackratKing

    Well-Known Member

    Jul 13, 2008
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    Crutches... automatic temp control my left foot !! Pardon my sarcasm, but Hakkos, and the lot, imho, are a waste of money... Electronic soldering, soldering in general, is not complicated at all... nor hard to master.

    Work on developing your soldering technique. Follow the three simple parameters for effective soldering... Cleanliness, flux, and adequate heat.
    Remember that your iron must conduct enough heat into the entire joint you are trying to solder as quickly as possible to keep the fourth parameter... Dwell time -- as short as possible...

    Go to the local dollar store -- some will occaisionally have nondescript 20-30 watt irons, that will do lead free all day long. I have several that are still good several years down the road, and of course, some will burn out in a week... Ya get what you pay for...

    Expensive or cheap models, don't leave your iron turned on when not using it... your tips may last longer... and nobody is in that much of a hurry that can't wait for an iron to heat up... Tips for specific purposes, are not all that hard to make...none will last forever...

    If you must leave it on, contrive a stand for the iron with a ceramic sleeve from an old large power resistor... That setup will sink excess heat from the iron, and keep it relatively stable during idle time.
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2013
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  3. shortbus

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 30, 2009
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    +1 on what Packratking says. Another thing I've found that keeps a iron tip good, is to tin it if it's going to be idle during use.

    The brand of iron has no effect on the quality of a soldering job. Brand of iron doesn't make you better at soldering, just like Snap-on tools don't make a better mechanic. Or a Stradivarius doesn't make you a better violinist.

    The best thing you can do for yourself, if having problems with your soldering, is to get some cheap proto boards and scraps of wire and practice!
     
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  4. Dr.killjoy

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Apr 28, 2013
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    I have a cheap iron as my back up and my skills as far as soldering I feel are pretty good and will post pics if you would like ....



    I think u guys are missing the point here... My Hakko 939 uses a 903 iron which was discontinued... So i contacted hakko and they said i could use a hakko 907 iron in place of the 903 iron... But my problem is that the 903 iron used a 3 digit code for a reference and thats what kept it calibrated correctly... With my 907 iron there is no code to use as a reference so the actually temp at the iron tip might be off +/-75 degrees ... My point was to use the thermometer to measure the real temp. And adjust from...


    Also would you trust that link from ebay?????...When you buy heating elements how do they come pack ?????
     
  5. shortbus

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 30, 2009
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    I think your also missing the point. The numbers are just that, a number. Has nothing to do with soldering. Set it at a number you think is correct, try it. If it doesn't melt or not fast enough add a little more to the number. If It works try dropping the number until it doesn't, then turn it up a little, until it does work for you.

    Have you ever been checked for OCD? :) :D
     
  6. Dr.killjoy

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Apr 28, 2013
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    LOL But I am ADHD and was brought up to fight it and act like a normal person and the OCD part is part of my engineering mind that is a perfectionist in everything I do ..
     
  7. shortbus

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 30, 2009
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    I'm ADHD too. When posting I have to go back and correct words before hitting send.

    And I know what you mean by "perfectionist" too. Was a die maker during my working life, had to make stuff to 0.0001" every day.
     
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  8. Dr.killjoy

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Apr 28, 2013
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    Lol Always good times when ADD kicks in .... I absolutely hate guessing at things .
     
  9. GopherT

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
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    What is the opposite of ADD? Most math is estimated and I don't think I have seen a third significant figure in years.

    I tend to be accurate with woodworking but I round off most everything in circuit analysis.
     
  10. Metalmann

    Active Member

    Dec 8, 2012
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    Never thought about that...maybe that's why I first got into Machining. ;)

    They didn't have a name for it back then. I just loved High Precision, everything. My toolboxes used to be SOOOO organized.:D

    Not so much, these days.:(
     
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  11. Andreas

    Active Member

    Jan 26, 2009
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    I can see both sides of the story here. The Doctor wants to know what his tip temperature is just to be curious / monitor elements behavior over time or for whatever other reason as sometimes it's just nice to know these things. I'd monitor mine too if I had the kit But... I also agree with Shortbus. I have used both Hakko and PACE analog temp controlled soldering stations for over 20 years on PCBs, SMDs, miniature strain gage elements and larger gage wires. The actual tip temp (although nice to know) is pretty irrelevant in the main scheme of things but what is relevant is how the solder flows at the joint junction, that the flux doesn't boil off like crazy and that the end product looks perfect. Do a practise run and ensure everything is clean prior to soldering! If no good, then adjust the dial up or down accordingly, (it's a feel thing / experience). Some of those cheaper cabled soldering irons you get which say 25W run way too hot for a lot of fine PCB work. Anyway, just my two cents.
     
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