IRF630A Spec sheet - anyone know of any other sources?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Tonyr1084, Apr 29, 2016.

  1. Tonyr1084

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Sep 24, 2015
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    I only know of Digikey.com for finding spec sheets for some of the old junk I have. Well, I have this N-channel MOSFET (if it's MOS). I'm looking for the spec sheet for it. I'm only using it to drive a small motor and I'm certain it is more than capable of the task. However, I'd like to have the specs anyway.

    Where do you go to find specs on various devices? As mentioned, I only know of Digikey as a source, and several times it has let me down. I also wanted the specs for an MPF102 N-channel JFET. At least I know it's a JFET. But I don't know its capabilities, and it might be too small to power this little DC motor. I'm using it in a PWM Motor drive circuit (below). If I have to I can regulate down the power, but so far I like the 12 volt speed this little D / V 5.9 (yes, that's how it's marked) motor can give. I don't know if I'm over-speeding it or if I should limit it to maybe 6 volts. The numbers on the motor are (if you care to give it a stab):

    RF310T-11400
    MD068212
    D / V 5.9 (made by Mabuchi [made in Malasia])

    PWM Motor Speed Controller.png
     
  2. SLK001

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 29, 2011
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    Try whipping out your Googlefoo next time.
     
  3. OBW0549

    Well-Known Member

    Mar 2, 2015
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    And while you're at it, you can Google "MPF102" to get its datasheet.

    Please note that a JFET is not, repeat NOT, a substitute for a MOSFET. Before you go any further, learn what these parts do and how they work.

    Also note that Digi-Key is a distributor, not a manufacturer. Digi-Key is often a good first stop for locating parts, and for every part they almost always have a link to the device's datasheet. Mouser is another distributor that many people use.

    And, as always, Google is your friend. Use it.
     
  4. pooroldplowboy

    New Member

    Feb 29, 2016
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  5. pooroldplowboy

    New Member

    Feb 29, 2016
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    A great source for tons of transistor and FET information, data sheets, equivalent devices, etc., is http://www.alltransistors.com/
    If that does not work, search for "All Transistors Database", and that will get you there. I use it almost every day.
     
  6. pooroldplowboy

    New Member

    Feb 29, 2016
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    I don't know if my reply posted or not, but I had an error in the address of my source of info http://www.alltransistor.com, should be the correct URL. You can get tons of information on transistors, FETs, datasheets, and equivalent substitutes for thousands of devices. I use it almost daily. If I messed up the URL, search for "All Transistors Database" and you will be amazed.
     
    Tonyr1084 likes this.
  7. SLK001

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 29, 2011
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    @pooroldplowboy Try editing your previous post instead of trying to up your post count.
     
  8. Tonyr1084

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Sep 24, 2015
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    @SLK001: Thanks for the DS. I've never heard of "Googlefoo". Is that an actual website? And you sound a little irritated at my asking. Didn't mean to irritate anyone. My apologies if I've offended you.

    @OBW0549: Thanks for your help too. As for JFET's and MOSFET's I know there's a difference. My lack of knowledge comes from years of BJT, but I've been away from the hobby for so long I find a lot has changed. A WHOLE lot. I don't know if it's just me but I get the feeling I've upset a lot of people. My apologies to all who are offended. Please keep in mind - the dumbest question is worth asking IF it brings even the slightest enlightenment. And I've been struggling to understand how these different FET's work. I'll get there - and no, I'm not asking for someone to give me a lesson. AAC has educational materials I've been reading and learning from. But it's hard when you have a rock solid mind set on one thing and trying to get my head around something new - it's not easy. The lack of hair on my head is a sign of a busy street. They say grass doesn't grow on a busy street. Neither does it on concrete.

    @pooroldplowboy: Thank you for the website. Your help is appreciated. I'll be sure to log that into my list of useful websites for sure.

    To all: Thanks.
     
  9. OBW0549

    Well-Known Member

    Mar 2, 2015
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    I can appreciate your situation: to say that a lot has changed in a decade is an understatement. I started in electronics back in the 1950's with vacuum tubes and germanium transistors, and the changes since then have been phenomenal. Today is a whole different world.

    No, you didn't offend anybody.

    Keep in mind that one of the major changes in electronics-- perhaps the biggest change of all-- is how incredibly easy it is to find design information on the Internet with just a trivial amount of effort. Long gone are the days when you had to thumb through a semiconductor manufacturer's catalog to find the datasheet for a particular chip or transistor, or ask around among your co-workers to see if anyone has a copy of it, or phone the manufacturer's field engineer or sales representative and ask him or her to mail you one. Nowadays you can just Google the part number or enter it into the Search field on the website of one of the distributors, like Digi-Key or Mouser, and be reading the datasheet in .pdf form in under a minute. Searching for "IRF630" on Google, the very first hit that comes up is to the datasheet at Vishay.com. Likewise with the MPF102. Getting information has never been easier-- and that applies to hobbyists just as much as to engineers. And it applies just as much to application notes, design notes, magazine articles and various assorted tutorial information just as much as to datasheets.

    Given this, and given that seemingly everyone knows how to do a simple Google search, some of us here at AAC (and at every other forum I've joined) get a bit irritated when we see someone posting a question that they could have easily found the answer to-- and an authoritative answer, at that-- with just a few keystrokes. And the reason for that is simple: in probably 90+% of the cases, answering their question simply means that we end up doing their Googling for them.

    And so, rightly or wrongly, your post caught a bit of that irritation. I apologize for coming off as lecturing.
     
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  10. shortbus

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 30, 2009
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    Googlefoo = kungfu of the internet.
     
  11. hp1729

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 23, 2015
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    I use www.alldatasheet.com for data sheets. They have most current sheets on most components. But they are kind of short on old stuff.
     
    Tonyr1084 likes this.
  12. pooroldplowboy

    New Member

    Feb 29, 2016
    4
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    I did edit it but nothing on the site indicated that it was ever posted. I was trying to help the guy out not "up my post count". I could care less about any post count number or snarky comments like yours. Get real, this site is for people who are enthusiastic about helping each other, not belittling them. Have a nice day. Hey I just upped my count thanks to you.
     
    Bernard likes this.
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