IR trasmitter/multiple receiver project help

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by distinctlyamerican, Aug 16, 2012.

  1. distinctlyamerican

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 16, 2012
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    Hey there folks, i'm very new to this forum and have only recently been getting into using IR technology, which i'm hoping to use for this project. Basically what I would like to accomplish:

    - i'd like to have 8 to 10 separate circuit board receivers, each equipped with a bright led or lightbulb.
    - i'd like to have a single IR remote transmitter (a universal remote maybe?) that controls each receiver individually (pressing 1 on the remote will ignite bulb on circuit 1, pressing 1 again will turn bulb off, pressing 2 will ignite bulb on circuit 2, etc...)

    This schematic seems like a good enough start as far as building receiver modules, what i'm not sure of is how to program each channel to a separate frequency that will accurately correlate with each module. I've done some reading on the fact that each button on a universal remote is capable of sending out unique code. Using a universal remote as the transmitter, how could I make each module read the specific codes of their respective remote buttons? Can I use stand alone circuits or will I need a micro controller for each unit? I apologize if I appear to be a bumbling fool, i'm very inexperienced with projects such as this and really would like to learn from what seems to be a very well versed community.

    If anyone needs more info from me in order to better understand what I'm trying to get across, please feel free to let me know and i'll supply with whatever I can. Any help (from direct advice on paths to follow to directing me towards sites that can offer me information that I will need) would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance and I look forward to hearing from you all soon!
     
  2. hexreader

    Active Member

    Apr 16, 2011
    250
    82
    This project is begging for the use of a micro-controller, but that would mean buying a programmer for it and a whole lot more learning.

    I wonder if this device might be a compromise:

    http://proto-pic.co.uk/programmable-ir-receiver-sis-2/

    Seems to be a ready-programmed micro-controller (my guess is PIC12F683 or similar), where someone else has done the coding for you.

    The micro-controller would replace IC1 in the schematic you link to, but of course would have to be wired up completely differently.

    The down side this ready-coded solution is the cost. For less than the cost of 8 units, you could buy a PIC programmer and do the job yourself (to your own specification), assuming that you have a suitable Windows PC already. ... but this requires more effort and some learning on your part. (fun though)

    just a thought....

    Disclaimer: I have not tried the device linked above, so I cannot comment on how good or how suitable it is. Just happened to spot it while browsing. I have successfully designed, coded and completed many IR receiver hobby projects, for many protocols, using PIC micro-controllers.
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2012
  3. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
    12,126
    3,048
    Take a look at the remote linked here. It uses radio and may not be quite what you need, but maybe will trigger some ideas.
     
  4. distinctlyamerican

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 16, 2012
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    0
    Hexreader, I don't think it would be a compromise at all. Given I went with the SIS-2, what exactly would I need to do in order to communicate/instruct it to do what I need it to do? Also, as far as attempting to buy a PIC proggramer and take it on myself, I do have some coding experience in C, Python, and Ruby. Will this help me out? Any programmers you could recommend? Online tutorials or books you could recommend to allow me to educate myself? Thanks all so far for the helpful comments.
     
  5. distinctlyamerican

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 16, 2012
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    0
    I'm kind of thinking about using this circuit instead possibly, as it would be pretty cool to use this sequence. Any tips on adding an IR sensor to the circuit and programming the 4017 to turn the sequence on and off?
     
  6. hexreader

    Active Member

    Apr 16, 2011
    250
    82
    Never used SIS-2, but reading the advertisement, it looks like the chip "learns" whatever remote signal you point at an IR receiver chip connected to it.

    As for learning PICs, the Gooligum tutorials are fantastic:

    http://www.gooligum.com.au/tutorials.html

    You can run through the tutorials using simulators at no cost if you prefer.

    Your C experience may help, but there is much more to working with PICs than just the limited understanding that standard C will give you. Understanding datasheets is more important.
     
  7. distinctlyamerican

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 16, 2012
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    Awesome. Thanks a ton. One more question, any universal remotes you could recommend for this project?
     
  8. hexreader

    Active Member

    Apr 16, 2011
    250
    82
    A Sony TV or video remote control is the easiest to work with if you are writing your own receiver code in a micro-controller. The protocol is well documented and simple.

    Presumably SIS-2 would work with a wide variety of remote controls.

    I see no need for a universal remote, in fact, in a strange way it might add complication, since you would not be sure what is selected.

    If you use universal remote, any one would do. I would select Sony TV if I was using a universal remote.
     
  9. distinctlyamerican

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 16, 2012
    5
    0
    Awesome. Time to get to work. Thanks so much for all your help.
     
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