Induction Heating

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by killivolt, Sep 25, 2013.

  1. killivolt

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jan 10, 2010
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    First let me say sorry, if this bores you.

    Last Night: I was reading another "Thread" about Induction Heating, I didn't know what it was until then, but in another "Thread" in another "Forum" they were talking about "Solder Pots." So I began to wonder?

    My Question in 2 parts:

    Part 1: Would solder be liquified in a vessel made of ceramic, using this method of heating? or is the Molecular structure to loosely bound in lead, therefor not heat by itself.

    Part 2: Do you think it could be heated in a vessel and liquified faster than a normal "Solder Pot" using this method of heating?
     
  2. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
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    You can absolutely heat solder via induction heating..

    Our solder pot is up to temp in only a few minutes.. Not sure why you might need something "faster"..

    Induction soldering is typically used when precise/rapid/localized heat control/input is needed.
     
  3. killivolt

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jan 10, 2010
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    When I was in Manufacturing, occasionally I would need to pull a component off during repair or something. So, the pot was alway's on. I thought to myself, well if you could quickly heat it up to temp (Induction) afterward, turn the pot on and hold the Temp long enough to use it, maybe it would be less wasteful.

    Both in time waiting and energy needed alway's on, so to speak.
     
  4. mcgyvr

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    yeah we have a solder pot for rework too.
    But we always do all rework at one time and it just takes a few minutes for the pot to be up to temp they do their rework and turn it off.

    Induction has its "niche" though.

    Frankly I think the neatest thing in soldering now is "vapor phase soldering"...
     
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  5. killivolt

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  6. PackratKing

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    Jul 13, 2008
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    I hate to be a stick-in-the-mud... but what is pictured in killivolts " hack " isn't exactly " Induction heating " I am aware of what vapor-phase soldering is...

    Google the term for actual equipment involved for induction heating...

    I absolutely love the principle for metalworking, since I don't have - don't want to use Oxy-Acetylene equipment to heat steel to bend...

    My little charcoal forge has its uses, but induction heating is the BOMB for amateur blacksmithing...
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2013
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  7. mcgyvr

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    Not a stick in the mud at all.. Unless that means you don't fully read/follow posts :D :p.

    The "hack" he posted about is "vapor phase soldering. We know its not induction heating. I mentioned vapor phase and he came back posting that link..
     
  8. Blackbull

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    Jul 26, 2008
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    In my younger days I worked for Lord Plowden (just name dropping) the company had patented an induction weld tube mill. Rolled tube would pass through a coil of copper tubing, that had water passing through it for cooling, at a speed of around 200 feet per minute. The resistance at the joint to the induced current would weld the seam.
     
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  9. strantor

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    Oct 3, 2010
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    I recently decommissioned/moved/recommissioned a Pillar MK2 150kW induction unit. It was pretty effin awesome. It screams, at 3kHz. Very loud. The sound changes as pipe moves through it. It can turn an 8" pipe with 2" thick walls from cold to glowing red in just a few seconds as it passes through the induction head.
     
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  10. #12

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    Nov 30, 2010
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    There must be some reason for using an audible frequency. Something about the size of the thing to be heated. I just hope I never meet a woman that can shout that loud.:D
     
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  11. MaxHeadRoom

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    Jul 18, 2013
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    The frequency can go from 60Hz (very large items) to the RF range for very small silver soldering for e.g.
    Max.
     
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  12. #12

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    and once again, I learn something on this site, something I never even imagined. Audible range induction heating! Whooda thunk it?
     
  13. MaxHeadRoom

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    At one time I worked at a facility that used Induction heaters running around the 450-470Khz range, the operators used to bitch like crazy, their (then) AM radios used an IF freq of 455Khz which made the radio's howl, They were not happy campers!
    Max.
     
  14. Blackbull

    Well-Known Member

    Jul 26, 2008
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    I had forgotten about the squeal from that tube mill - most unpleasant. OT - a company in that group received a tube from USA claiming to be the world's smallest. The lab guys put a tube inside it and sent it back, they were on the carpet until the management realised the publicity value. A lab guy told me he had seen a 40,000 feet order for tubing boxed up and put in an office draw for safekeeping.
     
  15. chuckey

    Well-Known Member

    Jun 4, 2007
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    "induction" heating is selecting a frequency at which the material is "lossy" - shows a resistance. So for iron any frequency would do, the lower the frequency, the easier it is to generate the power. For low loss plastics the frequency is 30 MHZ or so and to drive a lot of RF into the device a high voltage is used rather then loads of induced current. (dielectric heating).
    Now for a solder pot, as solder is highly conductive and non-magnet, it would need to be heated in the same way as copper. So it would have to be surrounded with a copper tube (part of a RF tuned circuit), which will induce power into the pot, but as its about as lossy as the copper coil, the coil itself will get as hot, so it would need to be water cooled - water would have to be pumped through it, else it would get as hot as the solder, not enough to melt it, but it would be nasty to use.
    Frank
     
  16. #12

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    Similar story: Somebody sent somebody, "The world's smallest wire". It was returned with holes drilled in it (and this was before lasers were available).
     
  17. strantor

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    Oct 3, 2010
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    You can induce a current in plastic?
     
  18. killivolt

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jan 10, 2010
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    More sound than current, creates friction at the joints
     
  19. killivolt

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    Well I was thinking ceramic inner and a steel outer for reservoir and at the bottom would be the heating element. Using the Induction to bring the reservoir up to temp quickly and the heating element is used to keep it at temp, while working.
     
  20. killivolt

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jan 10, 2010
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    Hey, strantor I'm going back to school. Working at the University has it's benefits, but I have to start from the begging, I haven't been in school for 30yrs.

    kv
     
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