Induction heater using 15V ~ 400mA wall trans.

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by Enigmatic Entity, Apr 29, 2009.

  1. Enigmatic Entity

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 16, 2009
    19
    0
    Is it possible to make an induction heater with this power source? I'm having a bit of trouble understanding the fact that these coils have "100A" flowing trough them.
    I understand that I'll probably need some sort of MOSFET circuit between the power source and the coil. I've tried searching the internet for a step by step way to make an induction heater, but haven't found any sources I can follow.

    Also, do they need a few turns of thick copper tube or can many turns of thin wire be used?

    Any replies greatly appreciated,

    e.E.


    btw, I'm sort of new to some of this inductance stuff, but the circuits I've seen seem to have a small amount of components, => easy?
     
  2. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
    15,635
    2,342
    Hello,

    Is there a link to the page you saw this induction heater?
    For induction heating you will need much more power than your transformer will deliver (upto several Kilowatts).
    Here I have some links on induction heating:
    http://www.educypedia.be/electronics/electricityinduction.htm

    Greetings,
    Bertus
     
  3. -SK-

    Member

    Apr 14, 2009
    25
    0
    It depends on how much heat you want to produce, but your supply is too small for any practical applications IMO.

    An induction heater works by creating a large resonant current in a circuit, which is inductively coupled into what you want to heat, say a piece of metal. The '100A' you mentioned is that large current. Here are some articles to read about induction heating, and parallel resonant circuits.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Induction_heating
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resonant_circuit

    The number of turns depends on what inductance you want your coil to be. One reason to use thick copper tube is that due to the skin effect, at a high resonant frequency your currents will be flowing on the surface only, so the center portion of a solid wire would be wasted. You can then pump water or something through the tube to cool it. A small thin wire might melt when a high current is passed through it.
     
  4. Hesham2009

    New Member

    May 6, 2009
    2
    0
    I thinkyou are using L circuit to get resonance i.e max possible current
     
  5. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
    15,635
    2,342
    Hello,

    Do you realize the thread is almost a year old?
    The TS will be gone by now.

    Greetings,
    Bertus
     
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