indoor antenna -> to -> Transmitter

Discussion in 'Wireless & RF Design' started by Bob T., Oct 23, 2012.

  1. Bob T.

    Thread Starter Member

    Oct 22, 2012
    35
    0
    Hello and piece.....
    I bought an indoor antenna like this:
    [​IMG]
    I wanted to change this antenna from receiver into a transmitter for my robot, and i am using Holtek ICs to send and receive instructions.
    So how can i change this kind of antenna into transmitter?
    Or its better to use external antenna like this one:
    [​IMG]
    :D
    Thank you all..................
     
  2. Bob T.

    Thread Starter Member

    Oct 22, 2012
    35
    0
    The problem is i want to amplify the radio waves so i can control my Robot from a large distances.
    Tnx.....Bob
     
  3. Audioguru

    New Member

    Dec 20, 2007
    9,411
    896
    The size of an antenna is determined by its radio frequency.
    But you forgot to tell us your robot's radio frequency.
     
  4. Bob T.

    Thread Starter Member

    Oct 22, 2012
    35
    0
    its about 435 Hz
     
  5. Audioguru

    New Member

    Dec 20, 2007
    9,411
    896
    435Hz is a fairly low audio frequency, not a radio frequency.
    Is it actrually 435MHz?

    If you make a directional antenna then its range is better than a single vertical whip antenna. Look in Google for Yagi antenna.
     
  6. wmodavis

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 23, 2010
    737
    150
    Hook it up to a transmitter instead of a receiver. Then impedance match it so that the transmitter power actually gets to the antenna.
     
    Bob T. likes this.
  7. Bob T.

    Thread Starter Member

    Oct 22, 2012
    35
    0
    i will try this, but do i need an amplifier?
     
  8. PRFGADGET

    Active Member

    Aug 8, 2011
    50
    7
    A "Gain" antenna on the transmitter and the receiver will make a good difference.
    As to an amplifier , that all depends on how much range you are trying to get out of the system (you haven't told us that).
    The "rabbit-ears" type antenna can be made to work but probably not as well as a antenna (s) actually designed for the frequency in question.
    Directional antennas will have more gain but depending on what you are trying to accomplish may present other problems (as in keeping the antenna pointed in the proper direction).
     
    Bob T. likes this.
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