Increasing Curing Time for Strain Gauge Application

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by xadrix, Mar 4, 2010.

  1. xadrix

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 4, 2010
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    Hi all,
    I hace a project where i have to decrease curing time for M-Bond AE-10 adhesive.
    The adhesive is used to mount a strain gage to a 600mm diameter spindel.
    I am planning to use a custom clamp and use a heat gun to increase the temperature..

    Any other ideas?
     
  2. jpanhalt

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 18, 2008
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  3. xadrix

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 4, 2010
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    Thanks john. I need to attach the strain gauge to a long spindle where i can´t use an oven therefore i need someting to increase the temperature in the mounting location.. any ideas?
     
  4. t06afre

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    May 11, 2009
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    A heat gun may be way to hot. I suggest using a hair dryer instead.
     
  5. jpanhalt

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    Jan 18, 2008
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    This sounds like a commercial application, and you probably want reproducibility. Note that the properties of the adhesive vary with the curing and after-cure temperatures.

    You might want to consider an electric heating pad or tape like Minco makes. There are several manufacturers. Some versions are temp controlled, or you can add temp control. Consumer versions are used for keeping water pipes from freezing or ice off of roofs. Such heating tapes are probably cheaper than the industrial versions.

    http://www.minco.com/

    John
     
  6. jans123

    New Member

    Jan 30, 2010
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    I doubt that heat wil help you to speed up the process.
    I am not familiar with the bond you are using, but most glue for strain gages are based on cyano-acrylate (superglue) and to them you can use a cemical accelerator on the gage -very, very little, it is some kind of catalyst.
    But, and that can be a little confusing, the glue reacts at humidity in the air. In the winter some bonds take much longer to react (It is a cemical process. The glue does not simply "dry").
    Sometimes it can help to breath on the gage and the object just to ad a little moisture to start or speed up the process.

    (Sorry about the language, my native one is Swedish)
     
  7. jpanhalt

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    Jan 18, 2008
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    The datasheet (see post #2) makes it clear that the adhesive in this case is an epoxy. Its cure rate and after-cure properties are quite dependent on temperature.

    John
     
  8. jans123

    New Member

    Jan 30, 2010
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    Sorry John, I didn't look at the datasheet. I haven't used epoxi for strain-gages since 1975...
    Today I use cyano- based bonds.
    /Jan
     
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