Inclinometer

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by studiot, Feb 10, 2009.

  1. studiot

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    Nov 9, 2007
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    I have received the following query. There is no reason for not publishing for everyone to see and comment on. However please try to make comments helpful, not a slanging match as this is a serious project.


    I don't think that a weight applied to a pot shaft is a good way to go. The shaft friction is unpredictable. The mechanical design to cause rotation to the same point for a given angle and to prevent the weight pulling the shaft right round is difficult.

    If you want to build your own inclinometer I would suggest investigating either toothed / perforated wheels on a common shaft, which you can register with a light beam. This is a transmissive system. Or you could go for a reflective system reflecting from coded patterns painted on a wheel. For an analog system if you painted a spiral of increasing brush-width on a wheel and measured the width where it intersected a fixed beam of light this would be proportional to rotation.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2009
  2. bertus

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  3. Bernard

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    Use a curved traugh with two strips side by side on the bottom , one metalic, other resistive[ paper strip covered with pencil lead?] Place a round ball [ or dollop of mercury ] in traugh. Apply voltage to ends of strip, metalic contact becomes the slider . Bias one input of an OP AMP to = level , othrr to ct. tap. Adj gain to convenient level; output porportional to +-slope. Might try a nicrome wire & a copper one of same guage.
     
  4. KL7AJ

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    You could also use a variable reluctance scheme....a couple of magnets with a moveable plate. Probably a bit more mechanical than the optical encoder, but truly analog. :)

    eric
     
  5. beenthere

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    If you can find Hall effect sensors with an unmodified output so their response is in proportion to the intensity of a magnetic field, then a small magnet hung on a string equidistant from 3 or 4 sensors should give good results. Take some calibrating, though.
     
  6. KL7AJ

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    I didn't know mercury came in "dollop" form. :D
     
  7. Bernard

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    One dollop = mercury from 3, 96 in. flourescent lamps, or what we could get from a broken thermometer.
     
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