if the velocity of light in the medium is assumed to be 2.10^-8 m/s, how much time...

Discussion in 'Physics' started by sofianets, Nov 24, 2012.

  1. sofianets

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 24, 2012
    8
    0
    if the velocity of light in the medium is assumed to be 2.10^-8 m/s, how much time does it take the light to travel through the distance of 60 cm?
     
  2. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
    20,764
    2,534
    First off, the speed of light is ≈3.00X10E8 m/s, I'm not sure where you got that number (X10E-8?).

    60cm = 0.06m

    So 3.00X10E8 m/s ÷ 0.06 m = 5e9 / s

    Invert it. S / 5e9 = 2e-10 S or 200 nanoseconds.
     
    sofianets likes this.
  3. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
    15,638
    2,344
    Hello Bill,

    I think you made a mistake with the conversion of cm to m.
    60 cm = 0.6 m
    So the answer is 3 X 10^8 / 0.6 = 5 X 10^8
    wich gives 2 X 10^-9 = 2 nano seconds.

    Bertus
     
    sofianets likes this.
  4. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
    20,764
    2,534
    Good enough. :D

    I am a lot familiar with inches / feet / yards / and miles. c = 186e3 miles/second, good enough for antenna work.
     
  5. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
    17,715
    4,788
    The speed of light IN A VACUUM is ≈3E8 m/s. The OP specifically said that he was talking about "in a medium".

    My guess is that he meant 2.1E8m/s, and not 2.1E-8 m/s. If I'm correct, then he is talking about a medium with a refractive index of about 1.4, which is very common. In fact, this is pretty much the index of refraction of the human eye lens. Most glasses are between 1.4 and 1.5.

    The speed of propogation of an electromagnetic signal in many transmission lines is about 2E8 m/s.
     
  6. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
    20,764
    2,534
    In designing antennas we are taught to use 90% of c. I'm not too clear on refractive index, but frequency does enter into this. Different colors of light move at different speeds in various mediums, which is how a prism works. It was also a problem in early fiber optic systems, which was solved by ultra pure LASERs.
     
Loading...