Identifying reflected electromagnetic waves

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by TheSpArK505, Sep 23, 2016.

  1. TheSpArK505

    Thread Starter Member

    Sep 25, 2013
    92
    0
    Hello Guys, hope you all doing well.

    I'm working on a project in communication, I need to transmit radio waves and recieve a particular wave. This particular reflected wave should have a change in it's characteristic so that I can discriminate it !! wheather it has x*wave lenghth of transmitted or it has a fixed higher or smaller frequency or anything .
    And what I need in particular is a substance (soild ). Like for example if this substance is in a shape of tape wrapped on a cup. when I send a signal this cup- among hundreds- will reflect a signal with a specific characteristic due to the tape, so that I can find it.

    I hope the Idea is clear.

    waiting for your answers guys.
     
  2. Kermit2

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
    3,795
    951
    You need to be researching microwave region material properties.

    Lower freq "radio" band radiation has a much lower interaction with small everyday common items.
     
  3. Alec_t

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 17, 2013
    5,813
    1,105
    Even if you do receive a distinctive signal, how will you know which direction it came from? Or isn't that important?
     
  4. jpanhalt

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 18, 2008
    5,699
    907
    Your title says electromagnetic waves; your question is far more restrictive. What you ask about doing is very easy to do with light and fluorescence. I am not aware that one get analogous fluorescence from radio waves and certainly not at room temperature.

    Can you use light?

    John
     
  5. TheSpArK505

    Thread Starter Member

    Sep 25, 2013
    92
    0
    No it's restricted to electromagnetic waves
     
  6. TheSpArK505

    Thread Starter Member

    Sep 25, 2013
    92
    0
    It's direction is very important, But with using radar technology we can overcome that right!!
     
  7. jpanhalt

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 18, 2008
    5,699
    907
    So then do it with a fluorescence tag and use image analysis.

    John
     
  8. TheSpArK505

    Thread Starter Member

    Sep 25, 2013
    92
    0
    John[/QUOTE]
    Do you recommend any link ?
     
  9. jpanhalt

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 18, 2008
    5,699
    907
    Do you want the fluorescence to be visible to others or in a portion of the spectra that human eyes can't see? Does it matter?
    John
     
  10. TheSpArK505

    Thread Starter Member

    Sep 25, 2013
    92
    0
    Actually I don't want it to be visible to human eye. I just got to sence it's exsistnce!!
     
  11. jpanhalt

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 18, 2008
    5,699
    907
    Then you should look up "near-infrared fluorescent dyes." Here is one of many links: http://www.lumiprobe.com/c/nir-infrared-dyes

    While you could also use UV dyes, because of the Stokes shift, you will have a more difficult time keeping the emission fully in the UV, and your source and detector would likely be more complicated than ones designed for IR. In fact with near-IR, you could probably just use the view finder on a typical digital camera to see which cup is marked.

    John
     
Loading...