identfying this transformer

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by gilly0, Mar 25, 2015.

  1. gilly0

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 25, 2015
    5
    0
    Hi there, I have this transformer.... It has come from a electric energizer which stoped working, after testing it all this was the only component to fail working tests. Underneath the transformer I found printed on the board, T1 RB85S/N
    It is a mains powered energizer so will be a AC transformer. I need a new one to replace this all I need is everyone's help on here to help me identify its specs. I have uploaded a few pics of it. As you will see it has no writing on it to help. If I can help you identify it by anything else I can tell about it then please ask

    Thankyou

    Gilly
     
  2. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
    10,140
    1,790
    I never heard of an electric energizer. Is that a phrase that came out of an online language translator? If the component is non functional and has no writing on it of any kind then you have two choices:
    1. Write to the manufacturer of the electric energizer and ask them
    2. Search transformer catalogs for something that looks similar
    If it is a proprietary custom designed part, then I predict you will never find a single scrap of information on it because they don't want you to find any.
     
  3. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
    12,118
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    That reminds me of the coil from my grill's igniter, in the sense that it is potted and impossible to replace.
     
  4. gilly0

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 25, 2015
    5
    0
    It's an electric fence energizer, I have emailed the manufacteres already, they don't wish to tell me what the specs are but just told me to purchase a new one. To buy a new one of this quality it's over £150 which is why I'm trying to find a new component to save a load of money. As for searching for one that 'looks' similar I have already done that too but there are similar looking ones but with multiple different specs. Does the letters and numbers mean nothing to you guys?
     
  5. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,539
    2,369
    Build one based on a ignition coil from an autowrecker, I believe I have seen a few designs out there, then you won't be held ransom to OEM parts.
    That No, is most likely an In-house part No, so may not mean anything to enyone but the OEM.
    Max.
     
  6. gilly0

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 25, 2015
    5
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    Can you remember where you saw these designs max?
    Gilly
     
  7. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    Google = electric fence from ignition coil.
    Max.
     
  8. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
    10,140
    1,790
    Congratulations. I think you've done everything possible on your end. It looks like it is not going to work out for you on your original path. Good luck hacking an alternative.
     
  9. gilly0

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 25, 2015
    5
    0
    Okay..... So alternatevly could anyone tell me what specs I would need for a transformer to have an input of 240v then an output of a regular pulse of 7000v?

    Thanks
    Gilly
     
  10. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    Here is a typical example, you would just need a 12vdc power supply powered from a 240v unit, you would not use the 240v without isolation, even on the original.
    upload_2015-3-25_14-13-33.png
    Max.
     
  11. gilly0

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 25, 2015
    5
    0
    Thanks max but I really could do with a 240v mains circuit instead of a 12v battery...

    Gilly
     
  12. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    You only need a small 240v/9v transformer supply and a bridge rect and capacitor, you require isolation anyway.
    A large enough WallWart would also work.
    Max.
     
  13. ian field

    Distinguished Member

    Oct 27, 2012
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    Buy a new one - from a different manufacturer, and hope they're more helpful when it packs up.
     
  14. umphrey

    Member

    Dec 1, 2012
    39
    1
    1. How do you know that it is a transformer and only a transformer?
    2. What test(s) did it fail?

    If I really wanted to fix this I would cut it open and see what's inside, assuming that I knew it was a failed transformer. If it's legitimately just a failed transformer you could probably replace it by counting the turns and knowing the voltage and current but that would surprise me because it is not common for a transformer to fail with all other circuitry intact.

    https://src.alionscience.com/pdf/TypicalEquipmentMTBFValues.pdf
    179,000 - 12,000,000 hours MTBF
     
  15. ian field

    Distinguished Member

    Oct 27, 2012
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    A transformer is probably one of the most difficult components to un-pot.

    Many years ago I autopsied a motorcycle voltage regulator that was potted, it took hours to grind away the epoxy with a 1/8" milling bit and everything got smothered in dust.

    It was impossible to liberate the resistors with code bands intact, and I just barely got them out in good enough condition to measure the values.

    Chances are you'll carve into the windings, so any subsequent measurements will be pointless.

    You migh just be able to distinguish between heavy and light windings - and if you're really careful/lucky identify which pins they went to before you ground the potting out from under them.
     
  16. umphrey

    Member

    Dec 1, 2012
    39
    1
    You could just saw it in half and count the turns assuming the wire isn't crazy small. There might be clues elsewhere in the circuit. This isn't a very safe solution, by the way. I'm still skeptical that the transformer caused the failure.
     
  17. ian field

    Distinguished Member

    Oct 27, 2012
    4,415
    783
    Maybe you could demonstrate this fascinating new technique...............................
     
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