I want an English name

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by happyganl, Nov 18, 2010.

  1. happyganl

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Dec 17, 2009
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    I dont have english name, dont know choose which one?
    who can give me some advice?
    "Mary" "Linda""Emma"...seems used too much.:p
     
  2. Markd77

    Senior Member

    Sep 7, 2009
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    Sarah, Hannah, Lisa, Kelly, Anna, Fiona, Paris, Penny, Zoe, Yvonne.
    Any good?
    <ed> post 1024 - my favorite number</ed>
     
  3. Wendy

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    Mar 24, 2008
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  4. happyganl

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Dec 17, 2009
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    "Fiona" sounds good
     
  5. BillO

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 24, 2008
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    What is your given name? It might help to choose and English name that shares syllabic pattern or phonetics with your given name.
     
  6. maxpower097

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2009
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    Mrs Rocky Mountains?
    Nah seriously do you have to pick an english name like in the indian call centers. If so I'll throw some names of some ladies I've know
    Susan
    Courtney
    Heather
    Sarah
    Lori
    Hagitha
    Shawanda
    Charmita
    Che Ne' Ne'
     
  7. BillO

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 24, 2008
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    Hardly!:confused:
     
  8. blueroomelectronics

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  9. jpanhalt

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 18, 2008
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    Why do you want an English name? Are you coming to the US or other English country?

    A name doesn't determine anything, but it may contribute to a first impression. Misty, Gypsy, Lulu might give the impression of someone cute and playful, but not too smart. Names like Katherine (Catherine), Nancy, and Pauline give a more serious impression. Some names are associated with different religions and races. Sara (no "h") and Rebecca are associate with Jewish. Names like Lejuana and Gyneatha are popular among blacks (it is more of a sound or spelling than any specific name). Some very old names are making a comeback. Names like Josephine (Josie), Emily, and Rose are making a comeback. And of course, even among English speaking nations, different names will be associated with different nations. It is also becoming a common practice for children to be given names derived from other nationalities, like Kaia.

    You have a great advantage in choosing your name as an adult, since your personality and physical characteristics are known. My advice is that if you are working with a group of American or other native English speakers, ask them what names they would like.

    Then, if you have trouble deciding, you could post a selection here for our opinions.

    John
     
  10. Kermit2

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
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    Choose one YOU like.

    Jay and Silent Bob would suggest, "Boo-Boo Kitty F---" :)
     
  11. t06afre

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    May 11, 2009
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    My suggestion is Jessica. As you somehow remind me of Jessica Rabbit. So it has to be Jessica. The name fit you very well
     
  12. happyganl

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Dec 17, 2009
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    my given name is "Sun",sound like [su:n],not sun on the sky:)
     
  13. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    Dawn is my suggestion.

    hgmjr
     
  14. happyganl

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Dec 17, 2009
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    John,thanks for the information,I dont have to pick one ,and most time I work with native people.but occasionally I need one
     
  15. Markd77

    Senior Member

    Sep 7, 2009
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    How about Susan or Suzanne, both fairly popular names which can shorten to Sue?

    (Are you just quoting film character names Blueroom? Multipass would be funny.)
     
  16. happyganl

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Dec 17, 2009
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    when seeing this name ,remind me of an actress;)
     
  17. happyganl

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Dec 17, 2009
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    Is it a little neuter? I feel its cool, but seems not easy to pronounce:D
     
  18. happyganl

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Dec 17, 2009
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    whatever ,when I see Susan,remind me of that aunt,sing"I dreamed a dream"
     
  19. jpanhalt

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    Many of these "English" names, like Jessica and Josephine, have religious significance in the Old Testament. Not that that makes any difference, but it does reflect Western culture.

    As for your name, if your "last" name is one syllable, like Wong, Yu, etc., I think short, two or three syllable names (e.g., Nancy, Mary, Pauline) go well and are easy to pronounce. You might want to avoid something that could have a double entendre, like Suzanne Yu (short version = Sue Yu).

    John
     
  20. t06afre

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    May 11, 2009
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    Perhaps a historic scriptural name. Like Lilit, Eva, Delila or Salome. All known to be important and famous femme fatles of their time period
     
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