I ripped my power supply off motherboard, can I get some guidance please?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Airvidal, Apr 26, 2016.

  1. Airvidal

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 26, 2016
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    Hi, I'm new to this site. I was hoping I can get some help on this matter. I have a Ps4 which I needed to replace a bad power supply, when unplugging it, I accidentally ripped the piece that is soldered to the motherboard. I was hoping I could solder it back on, but I don't know if this is possible. Can someone help me by giving me the green light to do it or if that would ruin the motherboard then give me the red light?

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. Airvidal

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 26, 2016
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  3. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
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    It "looks" like you have partially lifted at least one "pad" (the folded back copper) next to the brownish/tan capacitor.. If you can gently press it back down then you should be able to resolder that..
    As for the other 3.. seems like you have completely lifted/torn them.. Hard to tell but it sure looks like it.

    You can easily repair a broken connector assuming that the actual copper (or tin plated pad) is still there and connected (and not lifted/torn away)..

    If you've lifted it and broken the traces then you would need to either call it junk or use discrete wires to duplicate what the traces were connected to/from.
    You can use sandpaper on traces/areas with solder mask over it (the green color) to expose the copper underneath ..
    It looks like the top 2 pads go to the via holes/traces on the edge of the board and should be easy to replace with wires/tack wires onto those traces..
    The 3rd under those 2 "seems" to be connected to that large copper poured area (probably a ground pour) and if such sandpaper in that area should expose copper to tack a wire to..

    As to the lowest pad.. Looks like you can just fold that back.. stick it down with some super glue and resolder to it..

    For someone with enough skill.. That looks like a fairly simple issue to fix...
     
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  4. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    One method may work is to secure the piece ripped out with epoxy etc, but first solder single strand conductor to the pin etc or? and then solder the wire to a piece of PCB track that has the finish cleaned off.
    It is a case of getting creative dependent on the exact nature of the repair.
    It is a job to see what the component is exactly.
    Max.
     
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  5. GopherT

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    Nov 23, 2012
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    The dark green lines are your copper traces that make the circuit. The lighter green is empty space - all is covered in green "paint" so any attempt to fix this will require you to gently sand away the green paint (e.g. use small strips of 300 grit sand paper until you make your way through to copper). Then you will have to find a way to solder it (using jumper wires as described in post 3).

    Try folding the piece of circuit board back into place (slowly) and stretch it into position as you unroll it into place. Then we can see better.
     
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  6. Airvidal

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 26, 2016
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    So, are you basically saying that the piece that I ripped off was soldered on that green paper and it didn't actually have an open space right there?

    And yes, I can fold that lifted part down, I actually lifted it all the way cause I thought the soldering needed to go directly to the metallic part underneath
     
  7. GopherT

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    What looks "metallic" is actually bronze colored plastic. The metallic part is on the back of the thin layer that rolled up.
     
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  8. Airvidal

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 26, 2016
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    [​IMG]

    Ok, I put it back down, how does it look?
     
  9. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

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    That pad (folded down) looks fine.. Should be able to use that..

    Its the other 3 that will be the bigger issue..
    Those pads are gone (seem to be stuck to the connector leads now)..
    You will need to access the traces now with wires (sandpaper,etc.. as stated above) because the pad is gone and its severed from the thin trace that connects it to the circuit..

    A double sided circuit board is just a layer of "fiberglass" with a sheet of copper glued to each face (top/bottom)
    Like this http://precisionpcbs.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/pcb-laminate.jpg
    Then the copper is etched away on both sides in areas you don't want traces..
    Then solder mask is applied in any area you don't need to solder..
    Then liquid solder is blown over the surface and covers/sticks to any area where the copper is exposed that was not covered in solder mask..

    So those other 3 pads.. That seems to just be the "fiberglass" layer showing through which won't allow you to do anything with..
     
  10. Airvidal

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 26, 2016
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    So, going by what you guys have said so far it seems like it's a tough job but it can be done am I right? Do you think an electrician would take these kind of jobs or is this one of those too damaged devices where they'll rather not work it and just say "it's done, nothing to be done"? I'm just thinking about what you said earlier, that for someone with enough skill, this should be an easy fix

    I can learn to do it myself, I don't mind the time that it would take me if no one else would be willing to do it for me, but if it's something that would be done easily by an expert, I'd rather save the time. I'm just worried they would mark it as dead thinking I don't know anything electronics and deny service. If this is the case I won't waste time taking it in for a check up.

    Once again, thanks for all the help so far you guys, really appreciated!
     
  11. mcgyvr

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    Its fairly easy to fix if you have the skill..
    And "electrician" will not have the skill (more than likely).. This isn't pulling wire through a junction box..

    I'd say go for it yourself.. as long as you have a soldering iron, some solder and a few small lengths of solid core wire (old telephone/thermostat wire,etc..)

    I'm sure you can find a video/blog post somewhere giving pictures,etc.. of how to accomplish it..
     
  12. GopherT

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    Nov 23, 2012
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    The guys doing this sort of thing (not exactly this but close) are the local guys repairing cell phones. Specifically, changing glass screens on iPads and iPhones. They generally know how to solder and deal with the little non-standard connectors that come with the half-assed repair kits found on ebay.

    It is only a guess, just bring it in to one of them and see if you get a good vibe or not. If not, don't let them touch it. If they seem like they know what they are talking about and mention some of the same things you have been told here - give it a try. I wouldn't pay more than 20 or $30 for their attempt. Don't plan on success when you go in. You should feel lucky if they manage to fix it.

    Google on your city name with cell phone screen repair - to see what comes up.
     
  13. Airvidal

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 26, 2016
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    Alright, so I'll show someone these pictures and see if they know their stuff like you guys do, thanks for that tip @GopherT :) If I get a bad vibe I'll try it myself like @mcgyvr said :)
    Thank you so much you guys, you guys are awesome!!!
     
  14. GopherT

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    Here is an example of how to do it - they make a gap in a PCB copper trace and then repair. Note that they do not use sand paper, they use a very small but sharp scraping tool - it seems to work very well (better than sand paper).

     
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  15. mcgyvr

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    You just caught me on a good day.. :D
    Normally I would have just responded with "Its junk"
     
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  16. mcgyvr

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    Just fast forwarded through that one a few minutes ago.. Thats the way to "professionally" repair it.. Great skill on that one.. Overkill but thats the "right" way from what I saw skimming it..
     
  17. Airvidal

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 26, 2016
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    So the trace is for what exactly? Thanks so much for the video!
    And I'm so glad I did, I would have been lost without you guys!
     
  18. GopherT

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    A "trace" is the thin line of copper foil that is on the board that makes the circuit. Essentially a flat wire. The "trace" that comes up to each of the connections on the part that was torn off has to be connected to the parts of the trace that is still on the board.
     
  19. Airvidal

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 26, 2016
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    Aaah that makes a lot of sense, I just read through an article I found on the web and it said what a trace was but your answer is much more clear. I also read I could also make my own PCBs, this is so exciting, I might have found a new passion here!!
     
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  20. KeepItSimpleStupid

    Well-Known Member

    Mar 4, 2014
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    It's a tough fix, but not impossible. Copper foil tape: https://www.adafruit.com/products/1128 would be my first product.

    One trace seems to be to the ground plane. That's an easy one.
    Then there is one long one which some of the ground plane has to be removed and then some of the green so you can attach a piece of wire wrap wire to the trace.
    The third pad has an extremely short trace. That may be the hardest.

    The green is non-conductive.
     
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