I really good programmer

Discussion in 'Embedded Systems and Microcontrollers' started by MusicTech, Sep 7, 2008.

  1. MusicTech

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Apr 4, 2008
    144
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    http://cgi.ebay.com/USB-Microchip-P...39:1|66:2|65:15|240:1318&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14

    i found that on ebay, it seems amazing, but is there anything I am not understanding? It supports up to 40 pins and programs them standalone, right (with software of the PC of course)? It just seems to cheap to be real. I am not planning on being a "professional hobbyist" So I don't need it to program everything, just the common PICs.

    Thanks
     
  2. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
    22,182
    1,728
    It mentions software supplied on a CD, but no mention of what the software actually is, or compatibility with various operating systems. If your OS is Mac, Vista or Linux, you may be out of luck.

    There is no support for the new PIC16F88x series of ICs, which are much less expensive than the PIC16F87x series. This likely means that the programmer only supports +13v for Vpp.

    Always look at the shipping costs first. $10 isn't outrageous, but bumps the total cost considerably. That item could be shipped for less than $10. It's a not-so-hidden markup.

    The ZIF socket SAYS 3M on it, but it's most likely a counterfeit copy of a real 3M ZIF socket. A real 40 pin 3M ZIF socket would cost just about what they're asking for the whole kit.

    It's up to you - but you would likely be much better off to purchase a PICkit 2 from Microchip directly. You'll spend a few more bucks (not many) but you will get much more in the way of support. Microchip releases updates to program new uC's. With that vendor, your support ends 7 days after the sale.

    If you buy the PICkit 2 debugging kit, it comes with a PIC16F887 on a board already. The PIC16F887 is somewhat similar to the PIC16F877A, but has an internal clock - not as stable as an external crystal oscillator, but it frees up pins for other uses. It's also about 25% of the cost of a PIC16F877A.

    I suggest that you take a long hard look at the recurring cost issue. Every time you incorporate a uP into a design, you've dropped money into it. If all you're doing is one-off designs, that's not so bad. But if you were ever to take an item into production, cost becomes a huge issue.

    When I started fiddling around with uP's a decade ago, I found Parallax Inc. Basic Stamps, and bought a couple of them, and a board to program them with. They are far too expensive to even incorporate in a one-off project nowadays.
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2008
  3. nanovate

    Distinguished Member

    May 7, 2007
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  4. Tahmid

    Active Member

    Jul 2, 2008
    344
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    Why don't you just make a programmer? It ain't that complicated, but rather easy.
     
  5. Salgat

    Active Member

    Dec 23, 2006
    215
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    Programmers aren't that expensive to begin with, and the effort and materials needed along with the lack of a guaranteed working programmer are reasons to avoid making a programmer if you simply want to a reliable and professional made programmer.
     
  6. MusicTech

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Apr 4, 2008
    144
    0
    Yeah, I would do that, but I think the exact same thing as salgat

    Thanks a lot for all you opinions and input, much appreciated.
     
  7. MusicTech

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Apr 4, 2008
    144
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    So does the pickit program all pics up to 44 pins? That's the biggest I'm planning on programming for a while
     
  8. MusicTech

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Apr 4, 2008
    144
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    I know the demo baord said up to 20 pins, but is that the same thing as the actual programmer?
     
  9. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
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    1,728
    It uses in-circuit programming.
    See this page:
    http://www.microchip.com/stellent/idcplg?IdcService=SS_GET_PAGE&nodeId=1406&dDocName=en023805

    Basically, you build your board with provisions for the ICSP (In-Circuit Serial Programming.) The ICSP header is a standard size, and works for all supported PIC uCs; baseline (PIC10F, PIC12F5xx, PIC16F5xx), midrange (PIC12F6xx, PIC16F), PIC18F, PIC24, dsPIC30, dsPIC33, and PIC32 families of 8-bit, 16-bit, and 32-bit microcontrollers, and many Microchip Serial EEPROM products.

    The PICkit 2 programmer "knows" what voltages and the sequences required in order to program the supported PIC uC's. Not all PIC uC's are supported by this method, but the vast majority of the newer PICs are.
     
  10. gogo2520

    New Member

    Sep 16, 2008
    3
    1
    Hello
    The Pickit 2 is a ICSP programmer. It will program any chip that Microchip makes that supports ICSP. The kit is a programmer and a daughter board thar conects to the programmer. The daughter board that comes with this package only supports 20 pin chips. The 16F690 looks like a good replacement for 16F628/a. so its not a bad deal to start with. And they have different daughter boards to work with it or you can make your own. Oh the 16f628/a was the replacement for the 16f84/a. The 16f84/a is what got all the hobbiest going.
    I wouldn't order from Microchip Direct though, there online store is messed up. Somehow there part numbers got switched around. I know I just ordered some stuff and had to send hafe of it back. Had to pay shipping both ways.
    Mouser is a good place to order it from.
    Whats nice about the Pickit2 is its in a case and comes with a USB cable, pluss all the software. I had my share if DIY programmers, this way is better.

    have fun
    gogo
     
  11. gladesfe

    New Member

    Sep 15, 2008
    5
    0
    hei,do you know how to make a circuit diagram?
     
  12. gladesfe

    New Member

    Sep 15, 2008
    5
    0
    if yes,can you send a reply to my account.,.thanks.,
     
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