I need to hook this sucker up in a bridge setup

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by HHO-BLASTER, Apr 30, 2009.

  1. HHO-BLASTER

    Thread Starter Member

    Apr 17, 2009
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    I need to hook this sucker up in a bridge setup I can't get any mounting info on it. It does not come with a mounting kit

    It's rated at 150 amps and cheap but useless to me now
     
  2. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
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    Without photos, part numbers or a datasheet, we don't even know what you're talking about.
     
  3. HHO-BLASTER

    Thread Starter Member

    Apr 17, 2009
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  4. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
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    You mount it with a pair of screws, lock washers, and hex nuts to an aluminum chassis or block. I should think maybe 4-40 or 6-32. The ultra cheap method is to mount it to a block of aluminum with pop rivets. Nobody supplies "mounting kits" with semi-conductors since it would break the automated assembly machines when the loose mechanical pieces fell out. So quit your whining, and be a bit more resourceful.
     
  5. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
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    In the third bullet item under "Features" on page 1: o Screw mounting only.

    This means you chose the proper size screws to fit through the holes in the diodes. Screw the tabs to heat sinks that are electrically insulated from each other. Use thermally-conductive heat sink compound. Your local Radio Shack sells a small tube of it for a buck or two.

    Looks like the small tab is the cathode. Verify with a meter.
     
  6. HHO-BLASTER

    Thread Starter Member

    Apr 17, 2009
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    Radio shack LOL i think i have more parts home being a tech since i got out of electronics school in 1962, cut my teeth on tubes, but this part seems very strange, even the tech support at digi-key could not help out. I got a small job that i need to built 200 cheap high current bridges for

    But thanks for the try maybe someone has used these before

    Gary
     
  7. HHO-BLASTER

    Thread Starter Member

    Apr 17, 2009
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    The cathode is the 1 tab which bolts to the heatsink i think the trick is for me to find one just like it that has it's number 1 tab anode, and use two heatsinks and wire it up with #6 wire if someone knows that part number please let me know?

    Gary
     
  8. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
    20,765
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    There is a kind of tape called Kapton (it's a brand name, it's full name is evaporated aromatic polymer, I think) that is for extremely high temperatures. It's orange, and is used to mask off parts of a PCB in a wave soldering machine. Hot solder doesn't phase it in the least. I use it a lot for electrically isolating a case tab for a 220 case style package.
     
  9. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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  10. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
    22,182
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    I strongly suggest avoiding the use of KAPTON tape for anything more than very temporary use, and definitely not for anything that might be exposed to a flammable atmosphere, or in an aircraft or other critical system.

    The US Navy has forbidden it's use on aircraft since the latter 1980's.

    Kapton insulation has been proven vulnerable to surface scratches of even microscopic depth. It also has a "memory", and will tend to un-wind, along with breaking along scratches.

    While it handles moderate temperatures well, it is prone to damage by flashovers, which cause the surfaces to carbonize and thus become conductive, leading to more flashovers and sudden ignition of materials.

    This caused several mysterious aircraft crashes in the mid-1980's. Once the cause was tracked to Kapton insulation in several of the cases, it's use on all Naval aircraft was banned.
     
  11. HHO-BLASTER

    Thread Starter Member

    Apr 17, 2009
    13
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    Thanks guys for your help, i got 8 samples coming in
     
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