I need to confirm something about AC

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by vindicate, Aug 13, 2009.

  1. vindicate

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jul 9, 2009
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    When you have AC in your house for simplicity sake we will say it's 110VAC. I'm not worried about ground right now.

    You have 2 wires. One is +55 and one is -55 correct? Not one being 110 and the other 0 then alternating?
     
  2. Ron H

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 14, 2005
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    No, the neutral (white) wire is connected to ground (earth) at the distribution panel. The hot (black) wire is at 110V AC relative to the neutral wire. It actually swings from +155V to -155V (with your example of 110V) 60 times per second, with a sinusoidal waveform.
     
  3. vindicate

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jul 9, 2009
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    Well thank you for clearing that up. I now feel like a dummy :D
     
  4. someonesdad

    Senior Member

    Jul 7, 2009
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    vindicate, I applaud you for asking and you should never feel like a dummy. We all come out of the womb with the same amount of knowledge. You learn by asking or finding out by experimentation. There are no dumb questions.
     
  5. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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    Hello,

    I think the statement of somonesdad is true.

    Thats why I have the following in the signature:

    When you do ask questions, you may look stupid.
    When you do NOT ask questions, you will STAY stupid.

    The situation in europe is different.
    There are two or three leads.
    With two leads you have neutral and life (+ 324 to - 324 Volts sine wave) for the 230 Volts net.
    With three leads there is a ground added for safety.
    A ground leak meter in the home distribution box will cutt-off the voltage
    if there is a difference of more then 30 mA between life and neutral.

    Greetings,
    Bertus
     
  6. vindicate

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jul 9, 2009
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    I don't know where I got that from. I throught I was reading something about the waves were 180 degrees out of sync. But that must be something else like through a transformer or something.
     
  7. Ron H

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 14, 2005
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    The lines coming from the pole are 220VAC. This is a 3 wire circuit, having two 110VAC lines relative to neutral. The two hot lines are 180 degrees apart, so you get 220V between them. In the distribution (breaker) box, the two 110V lines get distributed to various circuits in the house. 220V goes to things like air conditioners, electric ranges, clothes dryers, etc.
     
  8. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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    Hello,

    Also in this case europe is different.
    We have here a three phase system.
    There are 3 phases 120 degrees apart.
    Between the phases we have 400 Volts.
    From phase to neutral we have 230 Volts.

    A normal household has a main circuit breaker of 32 A (one phase is used per home).
    A household with a 3 phase connection I do not know.
    The three phase connection is most times used for electrical cooking.
    Companies can have 3 phase systems.

    Greetings,
    Bertus
     
  9. ELECTRONERD

    Senior Member

    May 26, 2009
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    Someonesdad is right, never feel stupid! We all have to acquire knowledge and we all have different talents. Although, if you work hard enough you can make your interests become your talents. There are days when I feel stupid but I work even harder than I did on a subject I'm not familiar with. Just keep learning! Never stop!
     
  10. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    You'll find we welcome all questions here.

    Occasionally we have a troll make an issue, but they don't last, we also have excellent moderators that won't allow it.
     
  11. Dragonblight

    Active Member

    Aug 19, 2009
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    The only place in the entire world that i've seen this happen is on an aircraft carrier.

    But it does happen.
     
  12. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    I suppose it could happen in homes too, but it would be a dangerous condition.
     
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