I need a switch that can open and close the panel when the car has power.

Discussion in 'Automotive Electronics' started by knbpixels, Aug 10, 2016.

  1. knbpixels

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 10, 2016
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    0
    I'm a dunce when it comes to electrical circuits. I have no EE experience and don't understand most diagrams. I'm hoping to get some help with a simple circuit I need to draw up/design.

    This is for an automotive application. There is a linear actuator that will open and close a panel. There needs to be a switch that can open and close the panel when the car has power. I prefer the switch not have a "do nothing" state between the two states.

    There needs to be limit switches, at least one for the extend motion. If the actuator has built in switches and I use the built in closed state switch, that's fine. The other criteria is that when the car is turned on, the switch controls the panel. When the car is turned off, there is a relay that closes the panel, based on the presence of 12v from the accessory circuit in the car. Would it be possible to also wire in a separate simple switch to feed that same relay 12v even if the car is turned off?

    Basically I want the panel to close automatically when the car is shut off, but always be able to open with either one or two manual switches. And for the sake of clarity, a closed panel means the actuator is extended. The actuator will be this or something like it:

    http://www.robotshop.com/en/firgelli-technologies-l12-actuator-100mm-100-1-12v-limit-switch.html

    Lastly, I obviously wouldn't want anything creating a 12v draw even when the car is off and the switches are off.

    So I know what I want it to do, I just have a hard time wrapping my head around circuits in general! Any help is appreciated.
     
  2. Bernard

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 7, 2008
    4,170
    395
    Here is a simple solution using a manual DPDT switch. May be able to find a SW with a center position
    I think the actuator works like drawing.

    Lin. Actu. # 2 00000.jpg

    Linear Actuator 00000.jpg
     
  3. knbpixels

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 10, 2016
    4
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    Thanks, a couple of questions...I see the diodes, is that what you are suggesting be 5a 50V?

    What are the M's? Where should I put a fuse(s)? Does the DPDT switch need to be grounded, or is that the negative from the battery? Did I mention I'm terrible with this stuff?
     
  4. Bernard

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 7, 2008
    4,170
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    M = motor = input to actuator.
    Fuse in + M lead.
    Diode 1 A, 50 V or more. 1N4001 up to 1N4006.
    Ground = battery neg.
     
  5. knbpixels

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 10, 2016
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    Thanks Bernard!
     
  6. ion54

    New Member

    Apr 9, 2013
    4
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    How much current does your actuator need? The diodes shall be able to carry that current!
     
  7. knbpixels

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 10, 2016
    4
    0

    200 mA at 12 V
     
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