I hate linux...

Discussion in 'Computing and Networks' started by m4yh3m, Oct 11, 2007.

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  1. m4yh3m

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Apr 28, 2004
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    OK. I can't get any version of linux to boot off my hdd. For some reason I can't get the MBR to be written/accessed/something? I've wiped the drive out completely and installed slackware. I went ahead and did a DD for /dev/hda1. The file was saved under root, which is password protected. I am currently running knoppix. How can I access the root folder? Is there a way I can take ownership of the folder? gain credentials by inputting the password somehow? Please help :( If I can't get this to work, I'm giving up on linux forever. i've wasted 3 days trying to get this junk working. This is, sad to say, one of the many reasons why windows will continue to dominate. Heck, OS/2 wasn't this much of a pain to install.
     
  2. RiJoRI

    Well-Known Member

    Aug 15, 2007
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    "This is, sad to say, one of the many reasons why windows will continue to dominate."
    True. I use two open source programs, and almost ALL the problems are "I can't get this to work under Linux!" I've used them under Windows, and have had nary a problem getting them to run.

    That said, using Linux is a matter of religion, so don't get upset if anyone flames you! (Been there, done that, got the scars!)

    --Rich
     
  3. Salgat

    Active Member

    Dec 23, 2006
    215
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    Whoa whoa, you started with Slackware? Slackware is the oldest distro still in active production, and its installation retains many old features(I consider it to be archaic, although some prefer it). Try Ubuntu, it auto-detects/configures nearly all hardware.
     
  4. cumesoftware

    Senior Member

    Apr 27, 2007
    1,330
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    You should consider using Suse Linux with KDE environment. Works great! Or as Salgat sait, the new Ubuntu.

    The other reason is a whole bunch of drivers missing for Linux, because most companies won't provide them.

    P.S.: Long live OpenOffice!
     
  5. m4yh3m

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Apr 28, 2004
    186
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    You guys totally missed the problem: Boot up, MBRs, LILO, etc. I've tried to install SuSe, Gobo, and Gentoo...but they wouldn't work. I installed slackware with NO problems. However, the OS will not boot. Now, I've re-wiped my drive to clear MBR and everything else. I've made a 100 GB partition for XP. I will plan on making a /dev/hda1 = /boot, /dev/hda2 = /root. Once I install slackware, I don't want to modify the MBR and will opt for the superblock option. How would I go about extracting that portion for booting under the XP boot manager? Will I need to use DD again? Mind you, I've tried other partition configurations, but will stick with this current layout.

    As for flamers, let them. No amount of trying to "prove me wrong" will take away from the fact that linux in all of its divine glory still sucks a pang. I've done research into the situation. I've cleared the slate and tried multiple setups. When the OS fails to properly insert itself into the MBR like it says it did, then it sucks. XP also sucks as well. After formatting, I went through hell with the "activation" department for a new install id. I asked them why they told me I couldn't use this copy when I've had it re-activated over 10 times? (other issues). No operating system is without its flaws.
     
  6. m4yh3m

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Apr 28, 2004
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    I guess I should state my purpose for installing linux: I want to try the Neverwinter Nights client to see how well it performs under linux. Slackware seemed to be the most straightforward no BS flavor. It's been updated to include many of the new features seen in other distros. It's also the only one I've gotten to install. Gentoo throws a bunch of errors up, Gobo freezes, I think I got annoyed with how SuSe was trying to configure my system and just threw the dvd across the room.
     
  7. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
    15,815
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    I tried Redhat many moons ago, and had perpetual niggling problems. I have Kubuntu on a thumbdrive, and may try an install on an older computer, so I'm not sweaty about losing my data/functionality. I get put off on the constant glitch observations, but, then, there are people out there who use it reliabily and like it in whatever flavor.

    The first outfit that can make a computer act like an appliance is gonna get my vote (too late for the firstborn child).
     
  8. recca02

    Senior Member

    Apr 2, 2007
    1,211
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    My reason for not having linux is not many games are available for running on linux :D
    anyway maybe u shud look up for a solution on a linux forum(if that exists).
     
  9. Salgat

    Active Member

    Dec 23, 2006
    215
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    I'm surprised you're having a lot of problems, the only thing I can say is, that Ubuntu has worked with no issues on my desktop, laptop(for my homeserver), my Electronics Teachers Desktop(actually, he uses SuSe), my dads laptop, and two of my friends computers with no issues.
     
  10. Dave

    Retired Moderator

    Nov 17, 2003
    6,960
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    Based on what you state you need Linux for, wouldn't you be better using a Virtual PC running within your current OS. VMWare perhaps?

    Its a simpler method that does not require you dig through the intricacies of Linux or worry about your existing system configurations.

    Dave
     
  11. m4yh3m

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Apr 28, 2004
    186
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    I want to use linux without the additional overhead. I'd like to see if it runs games like NWN smoother than windows. I thought about trying to get Grub2 loaded... kinda difficult to locate it. Reading the FAQs on it, it seems like it would be a better choice than LILO. However, wants aside, I'm still confused as to how slackware wouldn't boot up after trying multiple installations for booting. I've dual-booted xp/linux on a laptop using the nt boot manager as well as being able to use LILO. Lets say I install slackware again, and it fails to boot from the MBR or boot manager. I put the slackware cd in and boot from that. How would I dd for the boot info to place on the xp partition for the nt boot manager? I've yet to be able to do that.
     
  12. Eduard Munteanu

    Active Member

    Sep 1, 2007
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    m4yh3m, Linux distros usually provide the user a non-privileged account, so that he can't wreck havoc by mistake/misuse. Full (root) privileges are gained with su or sudo commands if you are logged in as such.

    As for booting, I'd suggest you look around the Internet for a tutorial on how to install GRUB or LILO (in case of Slackware). Distros' installers do this for you most of the time, but there may be issues with the 1024 cylinder boundary or something similar if you're running on older hardware (this is the case if the Linux boot partition isn't the first one, but is located farther away).

    You don't need to extract the Windows bootsector/MBR. GRUB, for example, provides chainloader functionality. That is, it relinquishes control to a partition's bootsector of choice. Keep in mind that the partition that GRUB's bootsector is installed onto has to be the one active (can be done by setting the boot flag with fdisk). But why don't you want to install it on MBR?

    Also, it's easier if you first install Windows and then Linux, as Windows will mess with the bootloader if installed the other way around.



    Dave, VM emulators have bad 3D graphics support or lack it completely. There may be some hope, as in using an OpenGL-to-OpenGL proxy, but it's quite painful to accomplish. Not to mention the simulation overhead, which is really unsuitable for such purposes.

    P.S.: I recommend using GRUB as the bootloader. It's easier to set up and easier to maintain.
     
  13. Dave

    Retired Moderator

    Nov 17, 2003
    6,960
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    I concur. I initially thought m4yh3m was looking at just a general Linux install for general purpose testing. His later post clarifies that his focus is games which will require *significant* graphics capabilities, therefore precluding the use of virtual machines.

    Dave
     
  14. m4yh3m

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Apr 28, 2004
    186
    42
    I don't know why you guys keep bringing up everything else BUT my problem. My system is capable in all aspects of running the software. Like I said, I was able to fully load slackware. My problem is I could not get slackware to boot. My drives are set up as follows:

    /dev/hda0: NTFS, bootable
    /dev/hda1: RiserFS, /
    /dev/hda2: RiserFS, /usr
    /dev/hdb0: Swap, Linux Swap
    /dev/hdb1: Swap, NTFS

    There are only 2 questions I need answered:

    1. How do I extract the bootsector information from /dev/hda1 for a superblock installation, not an MBR installation?

    2. How do I access protected files (root password from installation) on /dev/hda1 when booting from the Slackware cd? from Knoppix? (Probably the same, but never hurts to add other options)
     
  15. sax1johno

    Member

    Oct 20, 2007
    17
    0
    If I have this correct, it sounds like you are trying to "dual-boot" Windows XP and Slackware. . . Please correct me if I'm wrong.

    I always partition the drive first by using the partition managers. Then, I install Windows XP allowing it to install its bootloader (ntldr). Finally, I install linux AFTER windows. This puts GRUB or LILO into the MBR where the bootloader is and most modern distros (including slackware) should offer some sort of graphical installer that will allow you to install onto the correct partition.

    Just as a note, you should definitely NOT use LILO. . .it is WAAAY outdated and is no longer used. GRUB is much easier to use. If you need to edit your grub menu, it is found in /etc/boot/menu.lst or somewhere similar.

    I would recommend that, if you don't have a great amount of experience with linux, you use either Ubuntu / Debian (installation is very easy and automatically works for dual-booting configurations) or possibly Fedora Core. These all have features that take care of installation and editing the MBR.

    Good luck!
     
  16. m4yh3m

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Apr 28, 2004
    186
    42
    just...delete this whole thread. i spelled out the questions i needed answered. i don't need people telling me not to use lilo, or how to partition the hard drive. answer the questions, or don't respond. don't mean to sound like a dick, but man... this is page 2 of the thread and everyone has replied with the *SAME* answers to questions i didn't ask. Don't recommend me anything. Don't tell me about how YOU install linux. I don't care if GRUB is easier or if LILO is out of date. It is not one of the two questions I asked. Reading comprehension surrenders.
     
  17. Ridius

    New Member

    Oct 22, 2007
    3
    0
    m4yham, I think I saw your problem.
    None of the Windows Boot Managers can read Linux Partitions. The easiest way is to install one of the Linux Boot Managers (I prefer Grub but Lilo is good too) and use it to boot. I've heard of a special application you run on your Windows Partition that lets you boot to Linux, but I've never used it and as such would advise against it.

    Hope this helps.
     
  18. m4yh3m

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Apr 28, 2004
    186
    42
    Question 1: How do I access/locate the Super Block to retrieve the boot sector information?
    Question 2: After booting Knoppix (liveCD), how do I access system files which have been pw protected under the root user/password during the slackware installation?
     
  19. TastesLikeChicken

    New Member

    Oct 26, 2007
    3
    0
    AFAIK, the same as when backing up the disk's mbr. The only difference is that you must specify the partition number. Use the dd command to write it to a file like this:
    dd if=/dev/hda1 of=hda1-bootsect bs=512 count=1

    More detailed info can be found here and certainly a thousand other places.

    It almost sounds like you're talking about files that have been encrypted but I doubt that's the case. In Slackware and most distros, files by default are not password protected. You either have permissions to read/write/execute them or you don't. Unless the files have been encrypted or your using an encrypted filesystem, please stop saying they're password protected. When you boot another distro like Knoppix, there is no restriction to your access to files from partitions that you can mount. That file system is your bitch when you're the root user. This is why sys admins will password protect a BIOS, so users can't boot CDs like Knoppix and wreak havoc on the local partitions.

    Mounting the / partition via Knoppix:
    From your previous post, you have your partitions enumerated wrong. Partitions don't start from 0. They start from 1. So for shits and giggles lets say root partition (/) is on /dev/hda2. Boot your Knoppix CD and go to a command line and type:
    Code ( (Unknown Language)):
    1. mount -t reiserfs /dev/hda2 /mnt
    2. cd /mnt
    Now go do whatever you want in /mnt because that contains everything from your Slackware install (except the contents of /usr).

    When you do run into issues, don't hop your soap box and bitch about how linux will never make it and then ask for help. If you don't like linux, don't use linux. Why were you such a dick to the people that tried to help you? They simply thought your NT install wiped lilo/grub from your mbr. Not so far fetched either. Anywho, I only made an attempt to answer your 2 questions because I want people to know the Linux community is helpful and friendly. Now kindly go f*ck yourself :p
     
  20. sax1johno

    Member

    Oct 20, 2007
    17
    0
    No need to get rude -- I was writing my post when you "laid out" your two questions. I've spent a great deal of my time on the Linux OS and am very passionate about it as a concept. When people begin a question by insulting the O.S. I've spent so much of my life trying to make easier to use, then ask for help, It's like being slapped in the face. People in the Linux community are very friendly, as evidenced by the number of replies you got in a forum that isn't even linux-centric. Hopefully jerks like you don't change that.

    The information from "tastes like chicken" is correct, particularly the "mount" part. Mounting a device is what gives you access to it. While you may want to backup the MBR, you probably will not want to manually update it unless you know what you're doing. Thanks "tlc" for your excellent advice.
     
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