Hybrid Battery Charger

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by td.actor, Oct 13, 2014.

  1. td.actor

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 13, 2014
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    0
    I would like to make a charger for reconditioning and equalizing the cells in a Toyota Prius.
    I would need to go from 110 vac to 240 vdc for the 2004-2009 Prius and 110 vac to 326 vdc for the 2000-2003 Prius. I only need 350mA of power as it is a slow charge to equalize and recondition the cells. I could either make 2 separate chargers or would prefer to make one with variable voltage. ( I bought a Medical Scientific Charger [Thermo Electron 57090ECA-115 ] that went from 1 - 500 vdc and up t0 2500 mA but when I hook it up to more than 6 modules it reads "no load" as there is too much resistance in the battery pack). I can buy the single voltage chargers for hybrids but I would rather build my own as they cost quite a bit and I would need 2 different ones.
    From what I have read so far I could double the ac voltage and then use a rectifier to get me to 340 vdc which would work then use a variable voltage regulator and a digital voltage display to get to my desired voltage.
    I don't know what parts to buy or where or how to wire it all up though including how to limit it to 350 mA?
    If anyone could help that would be great.
     
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  2. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
    12,094
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    Is that a problem? If it needs a small load in order to get started, you could put 3 small wattage, 120V bulbs in series to load it, in parallel to the battery. This might only be needed to get it started. A 7W christmas bulb (or 3 in series) would be just 60mA, so it shouldn't be an undue load on your power supply.

    Be sure your supply can handle an overload. Those are big cells and might draw a large current once they get a kick in the pants and get going.
     
  3. td.actor

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 13, 2014
    2
    0
    The problem is too much resistance, so the charger wont start feeding power.
     
  4. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
    12,094
    3,033
    Then apply your own load to get it started, such as the lightbulbs trick.
     
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