Huygens transmission and reflection mechanism of light.

Discussion in 'Physics' started by reerer, Apr 6, 2016.

  1. reerer

    Thread Starter Member

    Apr 1, 2016
    71
    3
    Huygens describes the transmission and reflection effects of light (fig 2 & 3) using spherical waves generated by the transmission and reflection surface.


    "If one considers further the other pieces H of the wave AC, it appears that they will not only have reached the surface AB by straight lines HK parallel to CB, but that in addition they will have generated in the transparent air, from the centres K, K, K, particular spherical waves, represented here by circumferences the semi-diameters of which are equal to KM, that is to say to the continuations of HK as far as the line BG parallel to AC." (Huygens, p. 24).


    Huygens' spherical waves originate from points K, K, K, along the transmission and reflection surface AB. The generation of spherical waves, by the transmission and reflection surface, represents the arbitrary creation of energy, away from the physical light source, which violates energy conservation. Furthermore, the spherical waves, that originate from the transmission and reflection surface, form consistent amplitudes when the points, of the spherical waves, are used to construct the transmission and reflection waves but when the spherical waves that are used to construct the transmission and reflection waves have varying circumferences; therefore, when the spherical waves are used to construct the transmission and reflection waves (fig 2 & 3) inconsistent amplitudes would form along the transmission and reflection waves which conflicts with Huygens' propagation mechanism where the partial wave KCL that are used to form the wave DCF, all have identical circumferences. Huygens' transmission and reflection mechanism conflicts with Huygens propagation mechanism of light, using expanding partial waves (fig 4). Furthermore, Huygens' spherical waves originate from points K, K, K, along the transmission and reflection surface and expand; points along the spherical waves are used to construct the transmission and reflection waves but the original points K, K, K, on the surface, where the spherical waves originate and the corresponding points, along the transmission and reflection surfaces, form varying distances which produces the varying circumferences of the partial waves. In addition, light propagates with a constant velocity; therefore, it is not physically possible for the spherical waves that originate from the transmission and reflection surface to form the transmission and reflection waves since each point on the spherical wave that is used to construct the transmission and reflection wave is propagating a different distance since the distances from the transmission and reflection surface where the spherical originates and the point that is used to form the transmission and reflection wave are different distances; henceforth, the points, of the spherical waves, would arrive at the transmission and reflection waves at different times which would not allow for the formation of the transmission and reflection waves, based on propagating spherical waves.
     
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