How to wind a DC speed coil

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by Peerless, Apr 8, 2008.

  1. Peerless

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 8, 2008
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    0
    I'm restoring an old DC ceiling fan. It was a 2 speed originally with a porcelain spool wound with resistance wire of some sort and layers of asbestos. It was made around 1900. Unfortunately the spool was shattered and only a remnant of the original wire and asbestos remained. I've gotten a new spool made from machinable ceramic and boughten a ceramic cloth which may replace the asbestos. But I've been unable to find anyone to wind the coil. I've been told that in order to get the speeds right the winder has to have the complete fan in running order.
    My question is: as an amateur, how do I do it myself? Are there (clear) books, web sites, or other things you can refer me too?
    I'm still willing to pay someone if you know of anyone in the San Francisco Bay area. Thanks
     
  2. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
    22,182
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    What is the make and model of the fan?

    Do you have an idea of what voltage the fan is supposed to operate on, and what the power rating or current required is? More particularly, are there any markings as to what current or power the fan required when operating at the two speeds?

    The wire you have left - is it badly corroded, or pretty good shape?

    What are the wire's dimensions (ie: diameter if round, width and thickness if flat, and total length?)
    What is the resistance of the wire? This can be tough to measure accurately, particularly if the wire is corroded. Nichrome wire has been around for a long time, and is usually pretty corrosion-resistant - but something that old...

    That's a lot of questions, but the more info you can give, the better recommendations can be made.

    Here is one link to a fan restorer:
    http://www.vintagefans.com/

    I received about 24,000 hits with this Google search:
    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=Antique+ceiling+fan+restoration
     
  3. scubasteve_911

    Senior Member

    Dec 27, 2007
    1,202
    1
    So classy :D Makes me want a cool vintage fan, ahhh, maybe one day :)

    It may seem like a fairly simple task, but there are soo many factors for something like this. I had spent nearly a summer trying to figure out how to design a motor, which is the sort of knowledge you would need in order to deduce what gauge of wire and turns, plus winding connections.

    As Wookie implied, the more information you have about the fan, the better. If you can get the wire gauge, that's one big step. Secondly, the number of turns would relate to the resistance predictably, but may not be possible due to corrosion. You can try to unwind the coils and count the number of turns. Perhaps take a few pictures before you take it all apart and forgot how the connections were made.

    Good luck! Maybe post a pic of it to make us jealous :)

    Steve
     
  4. Peerless

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 8, 2008
    2
    0
    Thanks for the 2 replies. I'm trying now to come up with information. Somewhere I have a catalog re-print. The fan motor has some info hand stamped on it but I'm hoping for more in the catalog. I'll make another posting when I run it down in the next day or two. If I can figure out how to post a photo I will. I know how to do it via email so if you send an email address I can send a photo or two to anyone.
    The fan is a Peerless HH 2 made around 1900. Unlike most AC ceiling fans which are snare drum shaped, the DC ceiling fans were usually barrel shaped. Things were wonderfully creative in those days. Some very successful AC ceiling fans had stationary armatures and whole outside fan housing spun instead. Some of the oscillator mechanisms for desk fans are best described as zany. Eurton Electric in Santa Fe Springs, Ca. rewound the motor for my Peerless, but didn't want to deal with the speed coil. They are used by many antique fan people and I recommend them highly to anyone with my limited capabilities.
    If you're curious, fan information at all levels and types is available at: www.fancollectors.org. You don't need to be a member to post or reply in the forum section. Thanks again for the replies.
     
  5. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
    22,182
    1,728
    Did you know that Peerless Electric is still around, but as Peerless Blowers?
    http://www.peerlessblowers.com/company/about_us/

    Kind of a long shot - but they might actually have some old specs in the Company archives. It's certainly worth the cost of an E-mail or phone call.
     
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