How to use electricity to bring temperature down.

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by JJoll, Dec 5, 2014.

  1. JJoll

    Thread Starter Member

    May 7, 2013
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    Hi,
    I know there are resistive heating elements that are used in electrical kettles and etc where you give electricity and they heat up and boil the water or etc. Are there anything like this where you can give electricity to get coolness??? I am looking for a device that is not peltier device. Is there any device or material that can do this?

    thanks
     
  2. ScottWang

    Moderator

    Aug 23, 2012
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    Google : cooling chip.
    Although it can generating cool temperature, but the same time it also generating hot temperature.
     
  3. jpanhalt

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  4. JJoll

    Thread Starter Member

    May 7, 2013
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    apparently cooling chip is another name for peltier device. unfortunately I cannot be using these, exactly for the reason that you mentioned. these devices heat up on the other side, very close to cooling surface. I want a device that isolates the heat releasing side, something that separates the cooling and heating side. I am not even sure if this is possible!
    I am trying to come up with a mechanism that will allow me to cool down a glass of water and I though of something that I can put inside the glass to cooling it down, using a peltier device will both heat up and down the water in which this doesn't make sense.
     
  5. JJoll

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    May 7, 2013
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  6. GopherT

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    Nov 23, 2012
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    People want lots of things, unfortunately, physics is not always cooperative.

    Chemistry, on the other hand, may give you another option. You may find reasons to discard this idea too but,at least it is another option. Search: instant cold pack

    http://www.amazon.com/Dynarex-Instant-Cold-Pack-Inches/dp/B004CQ5NUK
     
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  7. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
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    There have been some "self cooling" beer can ideas floating around for a few years now.. some use a release of CO2 to do the cooling.

    If electric cooling was easy/cheap you would know about it..

    Investigate what the military might be doing too as far as personal cooling for soldier,etc...

    A peltier device can work very well too.. and one can design around the heat output.
    Not cheap but http://www.amazon.com/IceProbe-Thermoelectric-Aquarium-Chiller/dp/B0006JKO6U

    A big part will be how much electricity you have to spare/use..
     
  8. alfacliff

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    Dec 13, 2013
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    practical electric cooling, a refrigerator or airconditioner, available at aplience stores everywhere.
     
  9. bertus

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  10. wayneh

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    Sep 9, 2010
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    No matter how you slice it, the heat you remove from your glass of water has to go somewhere, and must have a path to get there. A peltier solves this for many similar applications so I don't understand why it wouldn't work for you. The hot side faces ambient (usually with a heat exchanger to help dissipate heat), and the cold side faces the glass of water. What could be simpler?

    If the heat has to be moved further away, there are liquid cooling rigs widely used by the CPU cooler crowd.

    Me, I toss in an ice cube and move on.
     
  11. WBahn

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    Mar 31, 2012
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    So you are wanting a device that adds energy to a glass of water but yet the reduces the energy of a glass of water without providing a path for any energy to leave the water.

    After to get this done, your next project could be to make a simple device that extracts thermal energy from water and uses that to power your home and while spitting ice cubes out the back.
     
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  12. alfacliff

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    Dec 13, 2013
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    you could use the same method currently used to reach nearly absolute zero, two lasers to hold the atoms from vibrating, but this would not be very efficent, lasers use lots of power.,
     
  13. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    Heat pipes.
    If the water is hotter than ambient air, just drop in a heat pipe and it will suck the heat upwards into the atmosphere.

    ps, It's been fun seeing all these exotic ideas for cooling, and I do cooling for my day job!
     
  14. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
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    Another solution:

    dippy bird.gif
     
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  15. MrChips

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    Oct 2, 2009
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    The OP/TS asks for ways to use electricity to lower temperature.
    As I understand physics, electricity flow will always result in expending energy, usually resulting in a rise of temperature.
     
  16. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
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    Yup, at best you can use energy over here to move energy over there. There is no equivalent to a lightbulb that you can power to become cold. Maybe that's what the OP was asking for. It didn't occur to me that he was hoping to violate the laws of thermodynamics.
     
  17. Papabravo

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  18. cmartinez

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    Jan 17, 2007
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    All cooling devices are actually heat-exchangers... there is simply no way to cool something down without heating something up...
     
  19. profbuxton

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    Feb 21, 2014
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    I dunno, sometimes when I make an inappropriate comment I get a frosty stare from my other half that would chill molten metal.
     
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  20. GopherT

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    Nov 23, 2012
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    My wife's sister can do that, too. Wait, you might be my brother-in-law!
     
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