How to solder with prototyping board?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Peter Pan, Jul 6, 2007.

  1. Peter Pan

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Mar 24, 2005
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    Hello

    I 've got used to PCB but this time I need to solder using prototyping board. it has a contact per hole as shown on the pic attached and my question is: how to connect contacts - whether I should solder wire links between contacts required or solder contacts together into traces to connect them on board?:confused: what is normal practice in the case?
     
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  2. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    There no set standard technique used to interconnect the components. It is more or less left up to individual preference. As for myself, I solder the component or in the case of an IC, a socket onto the board.

    I would recommend you do a paper layout of the circuit using paper that has a grid on it. This approach gives you a chance to test your layout and work out how you will distribute the power supply voltages to the components.

    hgmjr
     
  3. cumesoftware

    Senior Member

    Apr 27, 2007
    1,330
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    That kind of board that you have there is used for wire wrapping, a solderless technique. I think that is the wrong type of board for your project. I would advice for the use of a stripboard or tripad board (the last is better for IC's). You will have to exercise your google finger (as someone said before).
     
  4. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    Indeed the prototype board pictured in the OP's initial posting is well suited to wire wrap but I have had good success using it for various projects in which I have soldered components along with the numerous point-to-point interconnecting wires.

    hgmjr
     
  5. mrmeval

    Distinguished Member

    Jun 30, 2006
    833
    2
    I have one that looks similar. Unless it's a plated through hole it's not good for wire wrap.
    Mine has pads on one side around the holes but no plate through. Use whatever hookup method makes you giggle that's technically correct. I've used the component leads, scrap wire, cut off component leads, pulled the stranded wire from old AC cords and separated the strands and several other types of wire. You can tack solder them on, run multiple wires in a hole. build teepee's of your diodes and resistors, etc.

    Now if your circuit is beyond a basic low speed analog or digital you'll not easily get away with that.

    As stated it's a real pain if you're using ICs unless it's a few pins and a very simple circuit. Those however are more expensive.
     
  6. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    mrmeval raise a good point about the type of circuitry for which the prototype board will be used.

    As with any pc board design, high frequency signals above a few megahertz will require additional care when it comes to your component layout. The board you have chosen has no ground plane to minimize the likelihood of high frequency coupling into adjacent circuits.

    It would be advisable to make liberal use of 0.1 uFd or 0.01 uFd decoupling capacitors very close to the IC used in your design.

    hgmjr
     
  7. cumesoftware

    Senior Member

    Apr 27, 2007
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    I don't think a stripboads would be more expensive than the board shown. A tripad board, maybe. A tripad board is really handy for projects with ICs, but for your project a stripboard will do.
     
  8. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    Here is an example Stripboard photo . Stripboard gets its name from fact that the copper is etched to form strips along the length of the board. Like the board pictured in the OP's original posting the holes are on a 0.1 inch by 0.1 inch grid. Other grid spacings are available in many cases. This type of board requires that cuts be made at various points along the strip to break the conductor path up to form the required conductor paths. A DIP (dual-in-line) IC package also requires the careful cutting of the strip as selected the IC site so that the appropriate pins are electrically isolated from each other. This strip format facilitates the bussing of power and ground. A handheld Dremel tool is my tool of choice when using this type of prototype board.

    hgmjr
     
  9. cumesoftware

    Senior Member

    Apr 27, 2007
    1,330
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    My tool of choice either, but for IC's a tripad board is better. Although, for this project a stripboard is really the best choice.
     
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