How to make a schematic?

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by Lightfire, Jan 21, 2011.

  1. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
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    1) Hello, how to make a schematic of a circuit?

    2) Also, may I know what is the name of wood (mostly yes, wood) that hide the wire so the wire will not be visible. I mean the wood that mostly use in homes that cover the wire.

    Any help?
     
  2. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    I've been watching the questions you've been asking. You have a lot of reading in front of you, as you need to understand electricity and electronics before you can document (draw) it.

    The AAC book is an excellent place to start. Here is the reference section on schematics and symbols, there are variations to them across the world, but nothing too serious.

    http://www.allaboutcircuits.com/vol_5/chpt_9/index.html

    The experiments section (Volume 6) show you how to apply many of the schematics in a practical way.

    If you haven't noticed, the first thing displayed on this site is the links to the AAC books. It is on the top of each and every page while you are on this site. Some math is going to be required, basically algebra. The calculus stuff is broken down into formula's you can look up as needed.

    Most house wiring (which is basic electricity, not electronics) is just dropped through the walls and routed through the attic. There are a whole different set of books you need to read before doing this, as a shoddy job here is a major safety hazard, and could actually catch your house on fire or kill someone. Generally we recommend getting a professional to do this kind of work, but if you have specific questions they will be answered on this site.

    I get the feeling you are using a Google translator, which is no problem. How good is your English?
     
  3. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
    690
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    No, I am not going to wiring a home. I am just asking what is that item.

    Also, I am not in electricity stuff. I just want to learn some of basic of it because I want to make a lighting in our adventure (which no need much more in electricity)...

    P.S. If I want to wire my home, sure I will call a professional electrician to do it so...
    If I use google translator, sure there's a little problem on my language. As for your question, I am not good so because I am currently at the year of around 9-14... (I would not like to say the exact.) and I'm not a English speaking child...

    sorry for your dissapointment.

    P.S. As you may see, all my questions are always regarding to lights, switch, battery, AC eletricty and DC. They are all BASICS...

    Once again, so sorry then... :(
     
  4. Kermit2

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
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  5. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    No problem guy. I suspected as much, how much experience tends to come through from the questions asked.

    When I was your age my parents gave me something similar to this...

    http://www.ramseyelectronics.com/cgi-bin/commerce.exe?preadd=action&key=PL130A

    http://www.ramseyelectronics.com/cgi-bin/commerce.exe?preadd=action&key=PL200

    http://www.ramseyelectronics.com/cgi-bin/commerce.exe?preadd=action&key=PL300

    It gave me a great start and taught me to learn how to read schematics.

    I also used wooden blocks with terminal strips to wire circuits up. I made a lot of mistakes, burned myself badly with a soldering iron, and basically learned from beginning. My brother and I disassembled an old color TV which provided many parts for projects.

    Beginners are always welcome here, so feel free to ask questions.

    A suggestion, link your country of origin on your profile. It will help us suggest parts sources.

    Does your school do science fairs? You can have lots of fun with those and using what you learn.
     
  6. Len Whistler

    Member

    Dec 10, 2010
    44
    3

    It's called trim or moulding. Trim is used to make corners and edges look nicer, usually along surfaces of different building materials. You could also hide wire underneath it, if it's OK with your local regulations.
     
  7. arthur92710

    Active Member

    Jun 25, 2007
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  8. nerdegutta

    Moderator

    Dec 15, 2009
    2,517
    785
    In the metric world, we call it 48 x 098. 48millimeters one way and 98millimeters the other. Yes it it 098.

    In Norway we are using drywalls a lot. And steel/metal studs. One thing the electrician is very careful about, is when wiring, he puts the cable as far in the middle in the stud as possible. Something like 22mm from the edge. That way, when the carpenter is putting on the plates, the screws do not enter the cable. That would result in a shortening, which is no good.

    I've found an Eagle tutorial, it is some years old, but the concept is still valid.
    www.ece.ualberta.ca/~ee401/resource/manuals/Eagle02.pdf
     
  9. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
    690
    21
    OK. Thanks.

    Yes, it is molding/moulding (in UK english) :) Thanks to those person who said/answered.

    @Bill_Marsden,

    No, we don't have any science fair. They don't even in electricity. They are always in lecture. The only thing that we discussed about electricty is the simple circuit, parallel/series circuit and we did parallel/series circuit using battery as a power source...

    Thanks again. I am going to search for that electric learning toy. Anyway, my parents would extremely not allow me to expirement TV. Whether old or new...

    P.S. I already put the country where I am living. I'm from the Philippines. (Asia, near Singapore and Malaysia)...

    Thanks!!!!!
     
  10. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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  11. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
    20,766
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    If you use them don't forget your buddies here!

    I spotted that site about 3 years ago, good eye and a good memory Bertus.
     
  12. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
    690
    21
    @bertus, Thank you!
    @Bill_Marsden, no I wont forget my buddies here and also co-forumers.

    Thanks again!

    P.S. It's a good web site for beginners. I will come back here for questions. ;)

    Lightfire
     
  13. marshallf3

    Well-Known Member

    Jul 26, 2010
    2,358
    201
    NEVER run wires through metal studs unless you've got the snap in insulators for the holes. Only common sense.

    Get a copy of the NFPA-70 - even if old - and read through it.
     
  14. nerdegutta

    Moderator

    Dec 15, 2009
    2,517
    785
    The wires are in a flexible plastic pipe. At least they are in Norway.
     
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