How to determine resistance between IC's?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by electronice123, Apr 26, 2011.

  1. electronice123

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Oct 10, 2008
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    I feel like I know electronics fairly well but I have always had a hard time determining needed resistance between connected IC's. Is there a general rule of thumb or chart somewhere I don't know about? Could someone explain how to figure the resistance needed between a 4027 and a 4001 when the supply voltage is 12v?
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2011
  2. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
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    Zero ohms works very well for all possible levels of Vcc (roughly 3 volts to 18 volts for 4000 CMOS). Why do you think there should be some resistance between the output of one and the input of the other?
     
  3. wmodavis

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 23, 2010
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    A rule is "Do Not Use Resistors where they are not needed." Why do you think a resistor is needed? What purpose would a resistor perform in this application? CMOS devices such as 4027s and 4001s are voltage driven devices. Maybe if you provided a specific circuit it would be easier to provide a useful answer answer to your question.

    beenthere hit it right zero ohms. They are hard to find though.
     
  4. someonesdad

    Senior Member

    Jul 7, 2009
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    The reason no resistors are needed is because the input resistance of a CMOS gate is typically high. Thus, very little current is drawn. The "CMOS Cookbook" (an excellent book, BTW) states the fanout can be 50 (or more) -- the actual fanout is limited by the line capacitances rather than the gate input impedances.
     
  5. electronice123

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Oct 10, 2008
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    What about a 555 to a 4xxx logic?
    I put 100 ohms between the two.
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2011
  6. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
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    The only thing necessary is that the signal from the 555 go to Vcc so the CMOS sees a high. The CMOS, as in post #4, does not impose a load on the 555 output.
     
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