How to design a 'phase-lead compensator'?

Discussion in 'Homework Help' started by woodmark75, Dec 14, 2014.

  1. woodmark75

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 11, 2014
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  2. t_n_k

    AAC Fanatic!

    Mar 6, 2009
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    Assume a second order response approximation of the actual response.
    The required PO then leads to the damping factor \zeta .
    The settling time needs to be stated as being within a certain percentage (5%,2%, ??) of the final value. This leads to a value of \omega_n given the required damping factor \zeta .
    Knowing damping factor and \omega_n then allows you to place a target dominant complex pole pair on the root locus plane. Presumably the uncompensated root locus doesn't include the target pole pair. Lead compensation design then requires you to "force" the root locus to intersect the target dominant pole pair.
    There is a wealth of guidance on the Web on how to do this. You should show some effort on your part to indicate you are at least familiar with the process.
     
  3. woodmark75

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 11, 2014
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    Yes I should have said that the Ts is +/- 5%.
     
  4. t_n_k

    AAC Fanatic!

    Mar 6, 2009
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    Other than the specifications given, one might also expect to have a steady state error specification. Could be important in the aircraft control.

    You also asked...

    "Would this make my compensator be: (s+Z)/(s+P) = (s+2.69)/(s+10.37)?"

    I don't think this will work. Even if you achieved the overshoot limit, you would be way off in the settling time.
     
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