how to convert pounds to feet? building copper coil

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by ElectromagnetNewbee, Sep 27, 2014.

  1. ElectromagnetNewbee

    Thread Starter Member

    Jul 13, 2014
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    i finally got the chance to work on the math for building a coil.

    My end result was in "pounds".

    How do I covert it to feet or inches or whatever?
     
  2. ronv

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 12, 2008
    3,293
    1,262
    You can google it and find a site that gives you weight per 1000 feet of copper wire.
     
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  3. alfacliff

    Well-Known Member

    Dec 13, 2013
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    look for an AWG, american wire guage wire table. tht has the specs for wire.
     
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  4. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,355
    6,853
    You're looking for a chart like this one:
     
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  5. ElectromagnetNewbee

    Thread Starter Member

    Jul 13, 2014
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    ha. nice.
     
  6. ElectromagnetNewbee

    Thread Starter Member

    Jul 13, 2014
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    5v/3.33 = 1.50 ohms
    datasheet says AWG 24 to find resistance per pound.
    it has 24.9870 ohms per pound.
    1/20.9870 = 0.0476
    0.0476*1.50 = 0.0714 Pounds of coil.

    Give me the calculation algorithm for this?
     
  7. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    6,853
    Glad you could see the humor in that post. :p

    I stole that chart from a place that was going out of business and have it hanging in my shop, but you need one of your own so you don't have to check the Internet every time you need to do a calculation.
     
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  8. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,355
    6,853
    No, 1.50 ohms x 1 pound /24.987 ohms = .0600 pounds.

    My chart says 20.702 ohms per pound in "single layer of enamel" wire, size 24 AWG.

    1.50/20.702 = .0724568 pounds

    Who ya' gonna trust? Some chart on the Internet or a poster from the 1960's?:rolleyes:
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2014
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  9. shteii01

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 19, 2010
    3,399
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    Copper density is 8.96 grams per centimeter cubed.

    24 AWG has cross sectional area of 0.205 millimeters squared. That would be 0.00205 centimeters squared.

    Multiply the two and you get 0.018368 grams per centimeter. This tells us mass per unit of length. Convert your pounds to grams and find out how long you wire is in centimeters.
     
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