How to calculate wide range?

Discussion in 'Wireless & RF Design' started by cpleng7, Oct 9, 2009.

  1. cpleng7

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Dec 18, 2008
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    Wide range is of the advantage of the AM circuit, can someone tell me how to calculate the range that AM wave can archive?

    Beside wide range what else is advantage of the AM transmitter?
     
  2. bertus

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    Apr 5, 2008
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  3. cpleng7

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Dec 18, 2008
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    is that the wavelength will be equal to the range of the wave to be transmitted?
     
  4. bertus

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  5. cpleng7

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Dec 18, 2008
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    If I want to find the distance that the AM transmitter transmit, is that any formula to calculate?
     
  6. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
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    There is no such formula that will produce the answer that you want.
     
  7. wr8y

    Active Member

    Sep 16, 2008
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    What everyone is trying to say is that radio wave propagation has more to do with range than modulation method.

    That means that the frequency you are on and power you are running determine range, not so much the method of modulation. Sure, CW or SSB are readable a LITTLE farther than AM or FM - but not much!
     
  8. ELECTRONERD

    Senior Member

    May 26, 2009
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    There are many variables that will determine the outcome distance. Such as weather, propogation, and especially your enviorment.
     
  9. wr8y

    Active Member

    Sep 16, 2008
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    I can see propagation, antenna configuration, weather and power - but ENVIRONMENT? What do you mean?

    How are you using the term "environment"?
     
  10. cpleng7

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Dec 18, 2008
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    if i want to prove the AM can be transmit to the long distance, how should i do. Can someone tell me?

    thank you
     
  11. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
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    In a situation where you ignore any other effect, use the transmitter output power. It attenuates with the square of the distance, but that can be calculated quite easily.

    Assume some level of sensitivity at your receiver. When the antenna it is attached to receives that minimum level of power from the transmitter, then you are at the maximum range.

    As you can see, the transmitter power out and the receiver sensitivity plus receive antenna gain all affect your calculation. Amateur radio groups have managed to get a signal transmitted at a 1 watt level and bounced off the moon - about 500,000 miles for that signal path.
     
  12. cpleng7

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Dec 18, 2008
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    why the scientist quite sure the AM is wide range than FM?
     
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