How much load can a 4mm copper wire handle.

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Sundeep Kumar, Jun 3, 2015.

  1. Sundeep Kumar

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 3, 2015
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    I'm not much in this before but I want to know that how much load (in kw) can a 4mm copper wire handle.
    Here are some details about wire I am using.


    Flame Retardant FR PVC Insulated Industrial Cable Copper Conductor 1100 Volt
    Number/Nom. Dia of wire mm = 56/0.3
    Thickness of insulation = 0.8mm
    Resistance (max) per km at 20 degree centigrade = 4.95 ohms

    Current carrying capacity 2 cable single phase
    In conduit trunking = 24amp
    In unenclosed clipped direct to a surface or on cable trays = 29 amp

    Well any kind of help will be appreciated.
     
  2. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    One element missing is the actual operating voltage?
    Max.
     
  3. Sundeep Kumar

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 3, 2015
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    Thanks for reply max. It's 220 volt.
     
  4. Kermit2

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
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    current (squared) times resistance

    (24 x 24) x 4.95 = 2.85 kilowatts of loss which will appear as HEAT along one kilometer of your cable.
    Volts times Amps is power you have applied
    220 x 24 = 5.28 kilowatts

    you will suffer approx. 50% loss using one kilometer of your chosen wire to carry the stated voltage and current
     
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  5. dl324

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 30, 2015
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    90-100 amps for chassis wiring. Lower for power transmission. These are conservative numbers and you should consult local electrical codes.

    Wire is generally rated in current capacity. Maximum voltage is determined by insulation.
     
  6. Sundeep Kumar

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 3, 2015
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    Thanks for the info kermit2. Correct me if I'm wrong as written on the wire it's a 1100 volt wire then why don't we multiply 1100*24 instead 220*24
     
  7. gerty

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 30, 2007
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    1100 is what it's capable of carrying, that's not what you are using though.
     
  8. Sundeep Kumar

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 3, 2015
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    Dwar gerty if I use the same wire in some country where operating voltage is 110 volt then by using above equation wire capicity will change. How can this be happen.
     
  9. Kermit2

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
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    loss formula is CURRENT squared.

    The lower voltage requires higher level of current for same watts. 220 volts and 1 amp gives 220 watts of power. If you lower the voltage to 110, then you must send 2 amps to get 220 watts.
     
  10. gerty

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 30, 2007
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  11. Stuntman

    Active Member

    Mar 28, 2011
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    How much can it deliver?

    It CAN deliver

    P=V*I
    V=1100V (I have to assume this is AC wire rated for RMS voltage)
    I=29A (I have to assume you are using open raceways)

    P=31.9KW

    Anything other than this is constraints of your application:
    What RMS voltage.
    What kind of raceway?
    Are you worried about total power delivered? If so, wire length comes into play (and you will most likely need a return path)

    Yes, a grid using higher voltages can deliver more power through the same wire.
     
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