How good is your color vision?

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by nsaspook, May 29, 2015.

  1. nsaspook

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  2. joeyd999

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  3. nsaspook

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    Updated the OP with an additional test.
     
  4. killivolt

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    24, and I tested as color blind in the red and purple as a kid. I think my eye surgery helped some I guess? (Cataract surgery) But; it's also easier for me when you put them together to show the shades.

    Not sure if this is correct or not; but most of the time a color alone by itself I have real issues; normally a reddish might be more orange to me. The web does weird things when you consider color differences from either Mac or Windows. I've notice it will be much different from either system.

    kv

    Edit: Test 2 the more accurate test was 28.
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2015
  5. tcmtech

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    Score 7 on first test. Not bad for 2:30 AM after a full day in the sun mowing pastures and planting trees. :cool:
     
  6. tjohnson

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    I took the first test and got a score of 14. Not too bad, I suppose. My eyes were starting to hurt at the end from staring intently at so many squares.
     
  7. Wendy

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    Last edited: May 30, 2015
  8. Sonoran Desert Tortoise

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    Using a monitor to sort plaques is a slightly skewed test method. Since a screen is RGB, all of the colors are achieved by pixilation, not color blending. That means you can notice the moire effect (kind of an aliasing or interference pattern). If you take your time and make a rough sort, then get your nose close enough and turn your monitor to black/white you can find the natural progression - assuming your vision is clear. I am assuming most who take their time will do better on this than on printed cards (using true-color inks, not a 4-color press). I'll have to repeat on a high resolution monitor / retina display.
     
    tjohnson likes this.
  9. nsaspook

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    True-color inks can test for tetrachromat vision, most people being trichromats won't see much difference at close distance to the pixels.

    http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20140905-the-women-with-super-human-vision
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetrachromacy#Human_tetrachromats
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2015
  10. Sonoran Desert Tortoise

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    I didn't say that people see more than three colors. I said true color inks eliminate the moire effect. Look closely at your morning news paper, the three (four) dots of color are obvious. If you are stacking very finely differentiated plaques next to each other that are printed on a 4-color press (CMYK), then the dot sizes of the off-set or patterns in the gravure press patterns will be an additional indicator of what the next plaque in the series will be (people with poor color vision will have a second (non-color) piece of evidence to make their decisions. It may even be unintentional but people make strange connections. As an example, I have a brother that claimed to hear fine, he just needed you to look at him when you spoke. The doctor told him he learned to read lips without knowing it and his hearing was shot.
     
  11. nsaspook

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    Good point. Maybe I cheated, with near-sighted vision I'm always looking closely at the screen. :D
     
  12. tcmtech

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    Interesting topic on the tetrachromatic condition. I for one have always apparently had a above average visual sensitivity to the infrared band being as long as I can recall I could see warm objects in dark conditions where no one else apparently could.

    One example is when I was growing up we would go on a summer travel vacation every year and we always would check out caves where ever we found one with public tours. At every cave on every tour they shut off all the lights to show how pitch black it really is yet for me after a moment or two I always seemed to still be able sort of see where people were at. To me most people who have been active seem give off a sort of dull silver grey ghost shadow effect.

    It's not real clear but I have been able to slowly move through a crowd without bumping into anyone just by avoiding the ghost shadows.

    At night when it's very dark, clouds and no moon, I have noticed that vehicle and equipment engines and exhaust systems also have this effect and its usually easier to see them when they are hottest.

    OrI just might be crazy. :p
     
  13. nsaspook

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    No, you're not and I know some people that know some people who might have 'job' for you... ;)

     
  14. wayneh

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    Could've done a little better but I got bored.
     
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