How does this method work!

Discussion in 'Wireless & RF Design' started by aj_silverthunder, Nov 15, 2009.

  1. aj_silverthunder

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jun 6, 2009
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    0
    guys i want to make a PCB,so my idea is to
    1) take a copper sheet,sketch the tracks on the copper sheets,
    2)cut them.
    3)paste it on a non-conductive board ,
    and 4) solder the electronic components at its appropriate place.
    does it work well,please help me guys,is it reliable.
    and friend also please give me any suggestions
     
  2. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
    9,030
    214
    Crude but doable. At least for leaded components like resistors, transistors and such. DIP packages would be tough to manage with this approach.

    The results would not be that durable in my personal opinion.

    hgmjr
     
  3. BMorse

    Senior Member

    Sep 26, 2009
    2,675
    234
    I have seen a lot of RF (radio) enthusiasts construct their pcb's using the "Manhattan" style layout, which is similar to your idea...

    [​IMG]

    They would cutout copper clad board pieces (single sided) and super glue them to another copper clad board, they would use the copper clad pcb they glue everything to as the ground plane.....

    My .02
     
  4. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
    9,030
    214
    bmorse,

    I have recently encountered this punched out pads method of breadboarding. It makes for a very neat 3-d look to a circuit. I would not care to employ the technique for more than a dozen components.

    I have not seen it attempted with DIP IC packages.

    hgmjr
     
  5. BMorse

    Senior Member

    Sep 26, 2009
    2,675
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    They use this technique with just about any component, DIP, Passive, etc..... It is really neat when a really well done board is complete...

    [​IMG]


    Here is a link to a "tutorial" on the subject ....
    has some really neat looking PCB's!! http://techref.massmind.org/techref/pcb/manhattan.htm
     
  6. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
    9,030
    214
    Cool.

    So they use a socket with long leads (ala a wirewrap style) so they can bend the leads out to obtain a more favorable lead to lead spacing. I can certainly appreciate the advantages this technique offers to the RF hobbyists.

    Not too shabby.

    I have begun to use stripboard for my circuits. I bought one of the small models of the dremel tool for cutting the tracks where needed. It is a battery powered model so that the cord does not get in my way. I like not having a bunch of jumper wires running everywhere.

    hgmjr
     
  7. aj_silverthunder

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jun 6, 2009
    116
    0
    can u please tell me what is the name of this type of PCB technique
     
  8. BMorse

    Senior Member

    Sep 26, 2009
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    it says it all over!! MANHATTAN STYLE!!
     
  9. aj_silverthunder

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jun 6, 2009
    116
    0
    What is the name of that board ,what is it made up of,is it a copper board or anything else!
     
  10. BMorse

    Senior Member

    Sep 26, 2009
    2,675
    234

    look, all pcb's start off as copper clad at some point in time< after it is etched all other copper is removed except for the traces.....

    Use google to find out how pcb's are made!!! And what they are made off, if you do not know these basics, then this might all be over your head, and no matter how we explain it, you will not understand unless you know the basics...


    My .05
     
  11. aj_silverthunder

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jun 6, 2009
    116
    0
    yes i know how PCB works,and i also know the basics,my doubt "is manahattan PCB is a different from normal PCB!"
     
  12. BMorse

    Senior Member

    Sep 26, 2009
    2,675
    234

    That is why it is called "Manhattan Style" PCB, NOT etched or milled PCB:mad:
     
  13. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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