How do you prepare for a job interview? (Electric Engineering)

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by EngIntoHW, Aug 24, 2010.

  1. EngIntoHW

    Thread Starter Member

    Apr 24, 2010
    128
    0
    Hi,

    I'm about to have job interviews for Electric Engineering student positions.
    In the first company, I'll be interviewed for a position in its VLSI department.
    In the second company, I'll be interviewed for Validation of Cellular Networks.

    I'd like to ask you a numerous questions please:

    1. How do you prepare for a job interview?
    Solving job interviews questions, reading about the position you applied to, etc.

    2. Perhaps you could elaborate on each of the above positions from your experience?

    3. I'm currently working for a company where I mostly program an Uc (low level and application level), and design small circuits (LED driver, temperature sensing circuit using a thermistor and an ADC), also test the functioning of more complex circuits (H-bridges, switching power supplies - DC level, noise).
    I also design the schematics in Orcad before we send it to layout.
    How shall I describe all my experience?


    I'd be happy to have you sharing your preparations for job interviews.

    Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2010
  2. tom66

    Senior Member

    May 9, 2009
    2,613
    214
  3. steveb

    Senior Member

    Jul 3, 2008
    2,433
    469
    You did a good job of describing your experience right here. This then allows the interviewer to probe further into a specific aspect of the above, if desired.

    Personally, I like simple direct statements like this. I hate when (particularly at entry and student level) people try to be too verbose and make experience sound too impressive with all the action words that traditional advice says they should use. This doesn't fool anyone. Just know your stuff to the extent possible, and when you happen to not know something, just be candid about that. You are at an entry level, and an open mind with the proper attitide (that there is still much to learn) is a good thing.

    Most important, be yourself and (as said above) stay as relaxed as possible, and don't come across as desparate. Instead try to give the impression that you are itching to get in there to work hard, learn and do good work.
     
    Nwuyag likes this.
  4. Markd77

    Senior Member

    Sep 7, 2009
    2,803
    594
  5. EngIntoHW

    Thread Starter Member

    Apr 24, 2010
    128
    0
    Thanks guys!

    Wow, I got here some great tips.

    I'll definitely keep it real, and after watching the 2 videos, I thought it'd be great to bring schematics of these simple circuits I designed, and graphs/tables of mechanisms I programmed in the Uc.

    Any other Students/Engineers are getting ready for job interviews here?

    Any more tips would be welcomed! :)
     
  6. EngIntoHW

    Thread Starter Member

    Apr 24, 2010
    128
    0
    Any people here who work as electronic engineers and can share their opinion? :)
     
  7. maxpower097

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2009
    795
    388
    Can't so much say on EE jobs because all of those just fell into my lap while I was stubling ass backwards drunk. But about normal job interviews just be loose, and be yourself. Some good HR people can tell when people are stressed and over their head. Keep cool, if you don't know, tell them you don't know, don't try to fake em with a bs answer. Be polite and just don't get all creepy. Just be honest, nice, and normal. Talk to them relaxed and like that are normal people. If they want kiss asses and fake people you probably don't want to work there anyways. :)
     
  8. Nanophotonics

    Active Member

    Apr 2, 2009
    365
    3
    I remember for my trainee electronics engineer job interview, I had many technical questions, mainly on analogue designs. I was interviewed by the chief design engineer. He even showed me some of their electronic products and asked me what were my opinions about the circuits and a lot of questions about my previous projects/designs. I did my best to answer the questions, some of which I could not answer, but I showed interest to research and learn more. I think I did well, because they hired me two months later. Now, I'm planning to become a software engineer. The electronics design & manufacturing industry has no bright future in the UK, at least at the moment this is how it appears.
     
  9. EngIntoHW

    Thread Starter Member

    Apr 24, 2010
    128
    0
    Hey,
    Thanks for sharing!

    wow, it's been 2 months from the first interview in this company until they called you to sign a contract?

    How many interview have you went through during these 2 months?
    How many of them were technical?

    Thanks again mate.
     
  10. Nanophotonics

    Active Member

    Apr 2, 2009
    365
    3
    They did take some time to reply. It was actually in April and the job would start in September, so I think it was fine. At the end of the interview, he confirmed me that I had been their best candidate so far. I didn't go to any other interview simply because I was travelling for holiday. Worst case scenario, I would have continued my education if they didn't hire me.
     
Loading...