How do I lower battery mA without lowering voltage?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by c0d3Man, Nov 8, 2011.

  1. c0d3Man

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 8, 2011
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    I have an IPod touch 2g that has pretty much had it. In fact, I plan on using it for random parts that I may use for different projects. Anyways, I need to get all my music and photo's and stuff off of it before doing so, but the battery was toast (and it doesn't help that I accidently cut hole in the battery case, but never mind that), I want to put together some rechargeable batteries to imitate the voltage and amperage of the original battery, I'm not willing to spend the money to buy a new battery for something that is otherwise useless(the touch screen is severed and the audio output circuit is fried. So any suggestions on how to go about my issue?
     
  2. Audioguru

    New Member

    Dec 20, 2007
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    An electronic circuit takes as much current as it needs if the voltage is correct.
    A battery with more capacity (more mAh rating) simply will play longer.

    A few tiny button battery cells in series will power a 12V clock. A car battery is also 12V and has a lot more current but it powers the clock the same.
     
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  3. c0d3Man

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 8, 2011
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    So I can just hook together a bunch of AA batteries and as long as the voltage is right it will work?

    Edit: Awesome, thanks

    EDIT: but wait... if you hook up an LED to batteries, if the current is to high it burns out the LED, if circuits only take what they need then why does the bulb burn out?
     
  4. Audioguru

    New Member

    Dec 20, 2007
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    An LED is a diode, it is not a circuit. An LED with a series current-limiting resistor is a circuit that takes only as much current as it needs if the battery voltage is correct.
     
  5. DerStrom8

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2011
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    That is because an LED has virtually no internal resistance. There is nothing to limit the current drawn by the LED. A low resistance means more current is allowed to flow, so theoretically, a 0 ohm component draws an infinite number of amps. That is why you need a resistor on an LED. It compensates for that extremely tiny resistance. Your MP3 player, though, has an internal resistance that limits the current itself.

    Der Strom
     
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  6. c0d3Man

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 8, 2011
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    awesome, thanks
     
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