How can i get better in circuits?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by bbb1004, Dec 3, 2006.

  1. bbb1004

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 3, 2006
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    I'm currently failing my circuit courses.:mad: ..I think i know all the theory stuffs but when it comes to solving circuits, it's really a different story...Is there any 'special' way i can get better in circuits beside trying many questions?:p

    Also, the problem with trying many questions is that there are not many questions with complete solution:mad:
     
  2. JoeJester

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 26, 2005
    3,280
    1,070
    You could post your circuit questions, your answers, and maybe the members can identify where you went astray and will recommend additional reading material for you to review.
     
  3. Dave

    Retired Moderator

    Nov 17, 2003
    6,960
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    You may not wish to hear it, but the way to get good at "circuits" is to practice and practice and practice - theory will only get you so far. If you are not prepared to put the effort into practicing then you may be best advised looking at another subject.

    Other than that, JoeJester has got it right - posting up problems or queries that you have come across in your learning of the subject is one of the best ways to learn. This site provides a wide range of skills and competances and you should get the necessary help to you through your studies and "get better at circuits" - that is provided you want to and are willing to put the effort in.

    Dave
     
  4. sci-3d

    Well-Known Member

    Aug 22, 2006
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    I think, Electronics Circuit, you must practice and practice.
    Sometime, you should review the basic Physics of Electrostatics and Magnetism.
    The Mathematics is important. Although you understand everything, sometime you may can not solve equation to find the solution of your problem. My suggestion is starting from the simple problem and then go harder problem.
     
  5. ixisuprflyixi

    Active Member

    Sep 16, 2007
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    Try breadboarding some real circuits instead of just workin with pen and paper sometimes the visualization of an actual circuit can make things stick.
     
  6. Distort10n

    Active Member

    Dec 25, 2006
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    I second this. There is absolutely nothing like setting something up in the lab and actually SEEING the results. People can talk a good game, and may be right too, but practical experience in conjunction with theory helps tremendously.
     
  7. mozikluv

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 22, 2004
    1,437
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    yeah, actual building of the circuit will certainly give you a wide array of good and bad experiences, and this is were things will really stick in your head. you may have the right theory, right calculation or may have used simulations, but when you built your circuit you suddenly found out it does not work. then you start wondering why. this is where you get the needed experience.

    and i might add, simulators can be a tool in designing and analysing a circuit but it can't replace for thorough understanding of the basic concepts of circuit analysis.:)

    moz
     
  8. arthur92710

    Active Member

    Jun 25, 2007
    307
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    My teacher says that knowing all the formulas is one thing, but knowing how to apply them is more important. If you know how the formula works it becomes alot easier.
    We learned about transformers last week. It was just some of the basics but some kids could not get it. But I saw how the ratios work and could find the values without the formula.
     
  9. thingmaker3

    Retired Moderator

    May 16, 2005
    5,072
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    When I was in "A school" in the US Navy, they told us "you can't call yourself a tech until you've fried some components."

    I concur. The only way to learn where the line is is to cross the line.

    Breadboard. Build stuff. Fail once or twice and succeed more than twice. Otherwise its all just numbers & scribbles.
     
  10. cumesoftware

    Senior Member

    Apr 27, 2007
    1,330
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    I think I gave this advice to other user, but saying the same twice will not hurt. Start with small projects and then raise the challenge step by step. I have seem guys that jumped to ambicious project without having experience (and I must say that practical experience is far more important than theory), and then quit, not only from the project but also from the whole subject. It happens everywhere.

    My advice is, buy a breadboard and put some theories into test. AAC has lots of circuits and experiments. Of course you have to spend some money in components, but the good news is that you can reuse them in other projects.
     
  11. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
    22,182
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    Pick up Forrest M. Mims book, "Getting Started in Electronics", and actually build the circuits.

    You can order it here:
    http://www.forrestmims.com/

    I have a number of Forrest Mims mini-notebooks, along with that book. They are really quite good, with lots of practical applications, and lots of handy general info in the beginning of the books.

    Save your nickels, and buy one of these:
    http://www.radioshack.com/sm-electronics-learning-lab--pi-2102913.html

    The books were written/the kit was designed by Forrest Mims. Very handy breadboard, too. Great for CMOS stuff.

    Working up Forrests' circuits will help you a great deal. I find his books easy to read; not dry and technical.
     
  12. ixisuprflyixi

    Active Member

    Sep 16, 2007
    52
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    Forrest mims is the entire reason I have a career in electrical engineering. There is no better teacher as far as I'm concerned. And the electro-lab is almost too good of a tool to learn on, you will be amazed. Great ideas sgtwookie.
     
    Henry7224 likes this.
  13. cumesoftware

    Senior Member

    Apr 27, 2007
    1,330
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    The books seem to be a little expensive. I think that "Electronic Principles" by Malvino would also be a good book to start (I must say it lacks the practical component a bit, but most of the books about electronics are even worse). The bench kit is tempting (I'm fighting to resist:D) and very cheap.
     
  14. thingmaker3

    Retired Moderator

    May 16, 2005
    5,072
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    I've seen used copies of the book for as little as $15US. It should also be available through interlibrary loan.

    AAC's online text, as noted by Cumesoftware, is also an excellent hands-on guide. http://www.allaboutcircuits.com/l_sitemap.html
     
  15. Henry7224

    New Member

    Dec 18, 2009
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    I need a good electronic Trainer with lab manual.
     
  16. Henry7224

    New Member

    Dec 18, 2009
    6
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    I need a good electronic Trainer with lab manual so that I can learn Electronics all over again.
     
  17. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
    22,182
    1,728
  18. Robin Mitchell

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 25, 2009
    715
    184
    My advice, and like everyone else, make many circuits that you have come across and failed at :)

    Im only doing electronics as a hobby and because of that, learning it is very fun and I want to learn more (if this does not make sense, its because im listening to MJ man in the mirror and cant hear myself think lol)

    DONT GIVE UP!
    DONT GIVE UP!
    DONT GIVE UP!
    DONT GIVE UP!
    GIVE UP! (?)
    DONT GIVE UP!
    DONT GIVE UP!
    I wish you good luck ;)
     
  19. marshsmello

    New Member

    Jun 8, 2009
    2
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    If I may add... There is the other side of the coin - all practice no theory so you could finish up copying the other's circuits and making them without even knowing how a capacitor works.
    My english is awfull, I know :(
     
  20. Forrest M. Mims III

    New Member

    Aug 31, 2007
    4
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    There's not much to be added to what the others have written other than to endorse actually building circuits. That's the way I learned--including smoking a fair number of transistors and ICs along the way. Get a solderless breadboard (or lab kit with one) and some parts and begin building circuits.
     
    Hop likes this.
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