How can I build my self boards with microcontrollers?

Discussion in 'Embedded Systems and Microcontrollers' started by rezaee, Oct 3, 2015.

  1. rezaee

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 3, 2015
    2
    0
    Hello!
    I am newbie in electronics and my university study field is computer! But I'm very interested to build robots and make electronic boards and controllers for them.

    My exact question is that: How can I learn to build a board for my microcontroller, sensors,motors,etc!
    I mean, I choose a micro-controller for my robot, and some sensors, some motots, some modules(rf, ect), and then, I want to build a board with this particles. How can I do that? I want to learn building the board with a micro-controller! or better say, I want to learn interfacing micro-controllers with other electronic equipment(sensor,motor,etc) and building my board!

    How can I reach to that point? which things there I should learn? Can you give me a Road-map to achieve my goal?

    Thanks in advanced , and sorry for bad English!
     
  2. shiva007nand

    Member

    Sep 25, 2015
    38
    1
    To build robot using micro controller first of all you should know about micro controller. As per your requirement you must have to choose which type of micro controller you are going to use 8051,PIC or ARM based.

    You should know the programming language to do coding part of micro controller like C or assembly and simulation part too.

    After getting much knowledge about micro controller go for hardware part of sensors, motors and required part.

    you can easily get lot of simple robot stuff on google, like how to interface motor to micro controller and all.
    Try to learn basic first.
     
    rezaee likes this.
  3. rezaee

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 3, 2015
    2
    0
    Thank you shiva
    I know c/c++ programming language. I know something about micro controllers and their peripherals. Also I have stm32 discovery board and succeed to setting up(?) some parts like GPIO, etc!

    But now, I want to know the knowledge that who designed discovery board has!
     
  4. dannyf

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 13, 2015
    1,771
    358
    "But now, I want to know the knowledge that who designed discovery board has! "

    it takes very little to get a modern mcu up and running: in most cases, you just need the chip itself, nothing else.

    the design of a board depends on the objectives for that board: what you want the board to do and what outboard peripherals you want to interact with. Most of it is bases o coordination and cooperation between hardware and software.

    without knowing specifically what you intend to do, it is hard to be more specific and helpful.
     
    rezaee likes this.
  5. shteii01

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 19, 2010
    3,380
    494
    If you use lower frequency oscillator, you can build uC board on a breadboard.
     
  6. atferrari

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 6, 2004
    2,645
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    Even with a clock (PLL) running at 40 Mhz, all my 18F micros run flawlessly in my protoboard. Those many Hertz move inside the micro.
     
  7. thumb2

    Member

    Oct 4, 2015
    66
    4
    A basic micro controller board could have just the power supply connection (USB and external), the programming connector, the oscillator connection and why not making the user be able to use it or not (suppose you want to use the internal one), the properly analog reference connected and then, all the GPIOs (referenced on the board) free, so the user can connect what he wants depending on he would like to do..
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2015
  8. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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  9. dannyf

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 13, 2015
    1,771
    358
    I have used breadboard + mcus all the time. I'm staring one in front of me that's running on a 24Mhz crystal, one on a 50Mhz external oscillator and another on a 8Mhz internal oscillator, all on a breadboard.
     
  10. shteii01

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 19, 2010
    3,380
    494
    Hm. I was afraid the breadboard capacitance would be too much for 40 MHz external oscialltor. I am not OP of this thread, but this does give me courage to try 40 MHz, I will probably do both, 11.xxx kHz and the 40 MHz.
     
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