How best to activate a pump to run for a set interval from a remote location

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by johnsteed, Dec 11, 2013.

  1. johnsteed

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 11, 2013
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    I have a recirc pump in the garage, I want to be able to push a door bell style button in the bathroom that causes the pump to run for 30 seconds. I also want a button in the kitchen that causes it to run for 45 seconds. I can run door bell wire from each location to the pump no problem. How can I best do this with off-the-shelf items that i can easily obtain? There are plenty of timer devices at home depot that turn the power on at certain times of the day or for a certain interval dialed in at the device. Is there an easy way to modify one of these to achieve my goal? or is there a better approach? or is there already a product out there that I can just buy? thanks in advance! :)
     
  2. t06afre

    AAC Fanatic!

    May 11, 2009
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    Hard to say. Perhaps it is better that you find some candidates amomg the timer devices. That you may think work. Then we can take it from there.
     
  3. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    I believe I saw this on "This Old House" TV show. A time limited push-button specifically for a recirculating pump. It has been invented. Maybe you can find it on their site.
     
  4. KMoffett

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 19, 2007
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    I would use a 40 sec 555 monostable in the kitchen and a 30 sec one in the bathroom. Run 4 wire telephone wire to each from the garage instead of bell wire. Use a 12v wall wart for power in and from the garage. +12, Gnd, and Switched on three of the wires. Diode-OR the Switched lines in the garage to a 12V relay that controls the pump...or controls a bigger relay if needed.

    Ken
     
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  5. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
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    Yeah, I think that would be the typical DIY approach.

    You can also buy lab timers that allow a preset time interval to be programmed into them, and then you would only need to arrange the remote switches. These lab timers would have all the relays, fuses, and so on that you'd have to build into your DIY solution. And they'd be easy to interface with, to set the timing. So they're maybe not as cheap as you would like but they're purpose-built for this sort of job.
     
  6. KMoffett

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    Last edited: Dec 11, 2013
  7. johnsteed

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 11, 2013
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    Thanks for all the suggestions. I can build a house and wire a house (AC) and am pretty handy but I'm not so smart when it comes to electronics or circuits. This suggestion seems like it may be the best direction for me so far among the ones posted. Can you send me some links to stores or websites where I can see/buy these? The pump runs on 120v ac and draws maybe 10 amps. I would think the best way to run it is to just figure out how to control it's power source and then just keep it turned on and plugged in...
    John



     
  8. inwo

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    Nov 7, 2013
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    Last edited: Dec 11, 2013
  9. strantor

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 3, 2010
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    I agree with getting a timer relay off ebay. But OP needs at least 10A contacts. I spent 10 minutes searching and didn't see one rated high enough for a decent price (<$20). So I would recommend using one like you linked, but with a higher rated interposing relay.
     
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  10. inwo

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    Nov 7, 2013
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    Thanks,
    I didn't spend much time looking, other than, voltage and time.

    Maybe OP could compromise on timing and use only one.

    Did op list current?

    I was just thinking. Some of my grundfos circ pumps are really low current.
     
  11. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
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    A 10A rating is a problem. Everything I can find so far is too expensive. I was thinking of something like this darkroom timer but that would require manual resetting each time it goes. And if you can't find a used one (they're everywhere), it's ~$200. Probably not what you're after.
     
  12. KMoffett

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 19, 2007
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    Just have the timers' relays drive an external relay: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Potter-Brumfield-Relay-KRPA-14AG-120-120V-10A-10Amp-A-W-Base-IDEC-SR3P-06-300V-/300697867132?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item4602fd537c

    Ken
     
  13. strantor

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  14. inwo

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    Nov 7, 2013
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    This thread reminded me of a delay off timer that I have for a welder repair job.

    It wasn't rated high enough, but while looking I found my cheap and dirty timer that I used while waiting for parts.:)

    2200 uf gives me 10 seconds from a 14vdc wall wart.

    Could possible do 30 seconds with fiddling.

    Anyone run a motor from a ssr? I've not researched it.

    If not this may be a helpful idea for something else.:p

    Simply power ssr from any source and it will stay on for the time it takes for C voltage to drop to 3 volts.
     
  15. inwo

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    Nov 7, 2013
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    ps.

    With diode steering this will do multiple and additive delays.;)
     
  16. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    I set some up for the Guys that use PC parallel port control of spindle motor routers etc , just a 2N7000 used to buffer the port to the SSR.
    Max.
     
  17. inwo

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 7, 2013
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    If an ssr would run his pump, this would be a very simple solution.

    Op might have to loosen his specs a little on timing. Think it would stay within 5 seconds or so.

    This must be true. I found it on the web!:D

    http://www.edaboard.com/thread289334.html
    "Re: control 220V AC pump with SSR
    I'm regularly turning AC water pumps on and off with an SSR, the pumps range from about 0.5HP to 4HP (about 400W to 3000W) and have never had any trouble, I use SSRs to replace mechanical switches because they are so much more reliable. Just make sure the SSR is conservatively rated, bearing in mind that water pumps may have a substantial mass of water to get moving so for a few seconds they may draw more power than their normal rating."


    I'll draw it up for critique....................................
     
  18. inwo

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    Nov 7, 2013
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    First try!.....................
     
  19. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    That must one of the Russian ones? ;)
    Max.
     
  20. inwo

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    Nov 7, 2013
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    No ssr in library. Wouldn't let me dump the "U" when labeling. :(
     
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