How a Capacitor Really Works

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by junglelord, Feb 5, 2010.

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  1. junglelord

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 4, 2010
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    How does a capacitor work, where is the charge stored?
    So you say the charge is stored on the plates!
    Thats what you were taught....and the professor is always right, correct?

    Want to see how a capacitor really works?
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ckpQW9sdUg
    MIT Physics Demo -- Dissectible Capacitor

    Clearly the Dielectric stress is in the dielectric material, not the copper plates, as is erroneous taught.

    Another clear victory of Tesla/Dollard theory of Electrostatic Phenomenon and Dielectric Field Theory.
    Dollard teaches that what we classify as insulators are really conductors.
    What we teach are conductors, are really electric reflectors.

    The MIT Demo clearly shows the charge is on the so called "insulator".

    Any thoughts?
    I am into Magneto-Dielectric Field theory myself.
     
  2. KL7AJ

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 4, 2008
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    This would make it hard to explain a vacuum capacitor, where there IS no dielectric. Unless you're suggesting that a vacuum can hold a charge.

    eric
     
  3. junglelord

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 4, 2010
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    The vacuum is charged. Thats not debatable. The universe is Electric and not controlled by gravity.
    The vacuum functions as a dielectric as it has a dielectric field.

    You never explained why the charge "on the plates" is not there.

    I just did. The vacuum is dielectric because it has a magneto-dielectric field.
     
  4. KL7AJ

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 4, 2008
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    If you take the case of a Van deGraff generator, all the charge is on the SURFACE of the sphere, which is why the total charge capacity doesn't care whether the sphere is hollow or solid. If it's solid, all the electrons would be repelled to the surface anyway. So it's really sort of a moot point whether its on the surface of the conductor or the surface of the dielectric in contact with the conductor, since they're in the same location anway.

    Now, in the case of a vacuum tube, you have a space charge because the electrons are boiled off a hot cathode. These are actually somewhat removed from the cathode, but this is quite different from a capacitive surface where each plate has the same emissivity.

    Although electric fields are FAR stronger than gravitational forces, in terms of mass....on universal levels, gravity is dominant, because of the huge masses involved. There's no gravitational equivalent to charge repulsion...or the universe would have an equal change of repelling objects as attracting them. I.E., gravity has no polarity, where electric charge does.

    eric
     
  5. studiot

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 9, 2007
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    By all means ask questions or provide explanations that give measurably verifiable predictions.

    That is part of the scientific method.

    But in my experience, semi-religous cants rarely if ever lead to productive discussions.
     
  6. junglelord

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 4, 2010
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    Just how was Tesla wrong?
    Have you ever built and tested a series capacitive, parallel inductive bridge?
    Maybe then you can see the results with your own meter. Thats my proof.
    Magneto-dielectric fields are key to microwave transmissons and cell phones...so I know my wireless.
     
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