Homework Help. Thevenin Equivalent and more.

Discussion in 'Homework Help' started by jd53887, Mar 9, 2010.

  1. jd53887

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 9, 2010
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    0
    1. Can someone guide me as to how I can build a Thevenin Equivalent model for this problem?

    At the output of a DC circuit, it's 6 volts without any load attached. With a load of 1kΩ, the voltage becomes 4.

    I'm asked to find the ohm and voltage of the Thevenin Equivalent.

    EDITS AS I SOLVE IT:

    I got the equivalent ohms by solving for Req = (Voc/Vab -1) *Rtest, which is 500ohms

    I don't want to sound stupid, but is the Thevenin Equivalent voltage 6v? seems too simple.
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2010
  2. t_n_k

    AAC Fanatic!

    Mar 6, 2009
    5,448
    783
    Your solution is fine. Vth=6V works. Too simple is better than too complicated!
     
    jd53887 likes this.
  3. jd53887

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 9, 2010
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    problem 2:

    v(t) = Vm sin (2(pi) * f * t)

    Vm = x
    2(pi) * f = y

    waveform 1: v(t) = x sin (y * t)
    waveform 2: v(t) = x sin (y * t - z)

    I don't know how to solve this. I'm looking through my notes... and I could solve it without that z (just add the x together)... but I don't know what to do now. x is 20 and y is 3.14159265 and z is 1.5 if that matters.

    I'm looking for the peak value of their sum and phase shift of their sum in degrees

    EDIT: What if I put this in the graphing calculator and get the Peak value? y= (20sin(3.14y)) + (20sin(3.14y-1.5))
    which I got the answer of 29.26754852234942V

    would the phase shift be converting z (which is in radians) into degrees? 1.5*57.3 = 85.95
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2010
  4. MilK

    Member

    Mar 1, 2008
    25
    0
    peak value of sum = x + x

    -z is the phase shift for waveform 2. phase shift of their sum = 0 + z
     
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