Home Wiring-110 but no 220

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Monster-Robot, May 14, 2005.

  1. Monster-Robot

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 14, 2005
    3
    0
    I have a 220v air conditioner that was working fine last year. Now the fan will turn very slowly but no other functionality. In addition, about a month ago my 220v water heater started acting oddly. Fairly hot water in the morning for one shower and then barely warm water for the rest of the day. No wiring or other changes have been made.

    I get 120 across both "phases" of both circuits (at the outlet and inside the AC unit with the case off) but get less than 1vac across the circuits. I have called my utility company and they assure me that my power into home is good. All breakers are good.

    Any help would be appreciated.

    Robot out....
     
  2. Firestorm

    Senior Member

    Jan 24, 2005
    353
    0
    hmmm... this sounds a bit odd :(
    110 across each phase addes up to 220 so you do have power. How old is your water heater and ac? Do you think this could be a problem? thx l8er

    -fire
     
  3. Firestorm

    Senior Member

    Jan 24, 2005
    353
    0
    the reason for your power being ok giving what you have said is shown in the attachment circuit I provided.

    a and b wires are your hot wires and n is grounded in a 220 circuit. when you test between a and n or b and n(what you did) you will get 120V ea.(around 120, depends on where you live and some still call it 110 which is fine). If you test a and b you will get 240V(anywhere from 220 to 240).

    If you want to physically test this which I don't recommend lol, touch both a and b wires and you will be hurt worse than just touching a or b with n. Since n is grounded and you are on ground, you will get shocked by just touching a or b. This is just some extra info that is not really smart to test lol :D.

    The problem is probly in your 2 appliances since power is going in and not coming out. More info on those will probly help you fix the problem :).
    hope this helps

    -fire
     
  4. Monster-Robot

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 14, 2005
    3
    0
    I have tested between hot wires A and B. I should have 240 but I get between 1 and 0 vac. To me this means that they are on the same phase and they should be on different "phases" or circuits. I had the same problem a couple of years ago and the utility company had a problem at the pole. Same problem, no changes but now they say it's in my wiring.

    I am too not worried about the appliances working correctly as I "know" that I am not getting the correct voltage, I just don't know enough about residential wiring to correct it. (for the record, my AC is about four years old and the water heater is about 6).

    Thanx!!!

    Robot out.....
     
  5. Firestorm

    Senior Member

    Jan 24, 2005
    353
    0
    Ok, that clears things up a bit.
    When you measured the voltages, did you put the probes from your DMM(meter) into the wall outlet or the appliance? About the best thing I can think of is to check the wall outlet, circuit breaker, and another 220 wire in the house. Most likely, if these turn out the way I think, you will need a service man out at your house. No point in fixing there problem then lol :). Just check those 3 things and post your findings. hope this helps

    -fire
     
  6. n9xv

    Senior Member

    Jan 18, 2005
    329
    1
    Try looking at the pole for anything obvious like overgroth, limbs even animals (squirels and such). I think your problem exist prior to the wiring entering your house. You may have to play "tough" with the power company a bit and insist that your end is working fine. The 0 to 1 VAC you measure is actually 0-Volts. What your seeing is ambient or transient fluctuations on the wiring. But for that to be so, something is not right.

    Try this; (and USE EXTREEM CAUTION)


    You may need another person to assist you

    1 - Switch all breakers off individually.

    2 - Switch MAIN breakers off.

    3 - Measure the voltage between HOT and HOT at the breaker pannel BEFORE it goes through the breakers.


    Now, thats the same as measuring the voltage right across the transformer as if you were on the power pole itself. All loading is dissconnected from the service.

    If you get no voltage or anything less than 240-VAC there than its deffinately the power company's problem. The voltage should be a rock solid 240 and nothing less. People erroniously reffer to voltage as 110/220. Thats a carry over from the "old" days when it actually was 110. If the power company is trying to sell you anything less than 120/240 then your being short changed! If the above is true then I would make that very clear to the power company.

    Let us know how you make out.
     
  7. Monster-Robot

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 14, 2005
    3
    0
    Thanx guys. I'm on hold until Monday when I can contact my utility company again.

    Robot out....
     
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