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Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by gh05, Jan 1, 2011.

  1. gh05

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 1, 2011
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    I would like to build a winder to rotate and wind automatic mechanical watches. I am planning to use several, probably 4, soho gear motors, model GBS35D-32090-15YC-HS-SP1. I would like to run the 4 motors together on 1 dc converter and to run at about 5-10 rpms for about 30 minutes several times per day using a simple timer. I also need the motors to reverse direction when they start up after being powered off. Can anyone help me with a very simple way to do this? I have seen devices that do this, but have not been able to get an answer as to how. I am simply a gadgeteer, and cannot read electrical diagrams. Thanks in advance for any help!
     
  2. CDRIVE

    Senior Member

    Jul 1, 2008
    2,223
    99
    Honestly, this thread will be futile, as this will not be a simple project.
     
  3. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
    12,094
    3,033
    Then why make one? If you just want a fun project, that's fine, but this isn't one to start with. If you're hoping to save money, you'll probably be disappointed even if your time is worth zero.
     
  4. gh05

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 1, 2011
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    The only part I am asking about is it possible to reverse the motor direction each time they are powered with something relatively easy, such as a relay setup. The rest is no problem.
     
  5. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
    20,765
    2,535
    Why would you want to reverse direction? The only reason watches are designed that way is the human wrist. Something as simple as a slow spinning rubber stopper lightly touching this stem would wind it, but the real challenge is how not to break it. To me this implies some sort of clutch, which could be as simple as a very loose coupling between the watch stem and the stopper, but the chance of doing damage still seems likely.

    So you have a simple motor, a gear box with terrific reduction, a rubber piece, and possibly a clutch/sensor to tell when the stem has stopped moving without putting undue strain on it. No electronics required.
     
  6. gh05

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 1, 2011
    4
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    These are mechanical automatic watches that are wound by an internal rotor, not by turning the stem. The whole watch is rotated.

    http://www.watchwinderstore.com/watch/winders.htm

    http://chronocentric.com/watches/winders.shtml#whatis

    Reversing the direction is advisable for less wear on the winding mechanism and internal clutch. The reason I was trying to build ones is that I collect heavy dive watches, often close to 200 grams in weight. The commercial ones, in addition to being quite expensive, have not held up to the weight of these larger watches. The commercial ones do have logic circuits for multiple different programs.

    <snip>
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 1, 2011
  7. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
    20,765
    2,535
    How about a simple cam mechanism? Back and forth is still very simple from a rotating wheel, similar to how the old steam engines worked.

    I still don't see where the electronics come in. This is a mechanical function.
     
  8. gh05

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 1, 2011
    4
    0
    A cam mechanism might work.
     
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