Home made pinball

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by DBoon, Jul 17, 2012.

  1. DBoon

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 3, 2012
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    I am learning about electronics by attempting to make my own pinball machine. Here I have posted a picture of a diagram I drew of a mission blue print.
    http://myp.mypicturetown.com/myphoto/member/myphoto.jsp
    Mission A select switch (x) is hit by ball and completes first memory circuit to join up with an off NOT switch to light bulb (w) and turn on transistor.
    Once the two switches (y) are hit they switch the memory switches and combine with the NOT switch to turn on lights (x). When this mission is complete (both on at same time), they in turn switch the mission complete light (y). When mission B and C are complete, they light (z) the game finished light.
    Please can someone check to see if this circuit would work and give me some tips for getting it sorted?
    Yours sincerely, Davey :)
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2012
  2. gerty

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 30, 2007
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    Your link requires you to join and login.
     
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  3. DBoon

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 3, 2012
    10
    0
    I am learning about electronics by attempting to make my own pinball machine. Here I have posted a picture of a diagram I drew of a mission blue print.
    http://a3.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc7/487839_10150950982366645_1934347594_n.jpg
    Mission A select switch (x) is hit by ball and completes first memory circuit to join up with an off NOT switch to light bulb (w) and turn on transistor.
    Once the two switches (y) are hit they switch the memory switches and combine with the NOT switch to turn on lights (x). When this mission is complete (both on at same time), they in turn switch the mission complete light (y). When mission B and C are complete, they light (z) the game finished light.
    Please can someone check to see if this circuit would work and give me some tips for getting it sorted?
    Yours sincerely, Davey
     
  4. DBoon

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 3, 2012
    10
    0
    I got 95 hits on this thread but because no one could see the picture, I didn't get any help. So I posted it again but by that time everyone thought they could not help. So I posted a new thread to get a fresh start, but now that it is blocked I will get no help from anyone, will I?
    Not only would I like more than one chance to edit my very important post. I'd like the ability to use the album function on this forum. Shame, on me! If only I could have deleted the thread.
    Will I ever get the chance to make my pinball machine?
    Will I ever learn about the components and the circuit I need?
    Woe is me!
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2012
  5. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
    20,766
    2,536
    How to upload an attachment.

    To attach a document or picture to a post

    Click "Go Advanced" at the bottom of your post,

    One of several options will pop up,

    Click "Manage Attachments" much further at the bottom of your post,

    To upload a file from your computer click "Browse", then select the file.

    Schematics should be .gif or .png format, pictures should be .jpg. .jpg formats will fuzz out schematics, and should not be used for that purpose.

    ---------------

    If you want to display this file there is an old thread I made,

    How to Display Attachments Full Size

    ______________________________

    Once you hit 10 posts some requirements become easier and/or go away. For now, attach your drawings, you can figure out the rest as you go. One this site especially, there is more than one way to skin a cat, I don't know them all.

    You will find we want to help, but there is no getting around pictures. As you have found out.
     
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  6. hexreader

    Active Member

    Apr 16, 2011
    250
    82
    I suspect that part of the reason that you have not had help, is that you are clearly trying to complete a complicated project without understanding the basics.

    I would suggest that you start much simpler, maybe with just a switch, two gates ,some resistors and one light bulb and try out some simple circuits on solderless breadboard. Use a voltmeter to find out how your simple circuit is operating, or find out the reason that it is not operating.

    You will soon discover that there are many problems with your basic designs.

    When you have a manageable problem, then I am sure that offers of help will come flooding in.
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2012
    DBoon likes this.
  7. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
    20,766
    2,536
    Actually the above is good advice. Breaking problems into small, bite sized pieces is good design practice.
     
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  8. DBoon

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 3, 2012
    10
    0
    Thank you both very much, thats just the kind of advice I was looking for.
     
  9. DBoon

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 3, 2012
    10
    0
    Okay, I played around with some electronics and decided to make it simpler.

    One curcuit needs to be completed, then both can be completed to light the last light.

    Please can someone tell me if this curcuit would work.

    PS. I'm using the public library for this so please exuse the bad image.
     
  10. hexreader

    Active Member

    Apr 16, 2011
    250
    82
    Did you play around with real electronic components (well worth while and you will learn), or just messed around with doodles on paper (complete and utter waste of time)?

    Do not ask us if the circuit will work. Try out a far, far simpler circuit for yourself. You will find out that it does not work.

    Follow my earlier advice. Start with one switch, one lamp, one battery and one logic gate. What you have shown is is still far to complex to learn from.

    Once you have a switch on a logic input lighting a light on a logic output, you can gradually add more components as you learn. You are currently a long way from even this starting point.

    Build it for real. See what happens. Use a voltmeter to find out why it does not work.

    At least, that is what I think that you should do.

    By the way, what is the part number of the integrated circuit that you are using that contains the logic gates?


    EDIT: Doh...... the obvious advice is staring me in the face, but I could not see it....
    Go through ALL of the tutorials listed at the top of this forum. You will be an expert in no time.
    Once you have some education and some understanding, then is the time to think about designing pinball machines, not before.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2012
  11. DBoon

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 3, 2012
    10
    0
    15ALG8K CD4081BE E4. It's a Quad 2 input AND CMOS logic gate.

    The library will not let me sit here for as long as it takes to read that. Sorry.
     
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